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Full text of "Dragon User Magazine Issue 54"

mM 



October 1987 



The independent Dragon magazine 



Contents 



Letters 2 

Expensive software from Americsi ... 
graphics Jnint . . . why no DragonDOS book? 
... Tandy DMPlOS superseded ... where is 
Peter Whitlaker? ... Stylograph suggestion 
... Tally mod ... vi-deo upgrade ... directory 
directive ... where are the birds? 

News 4 

Oragcjfi User back issues ... software from 
The Solver ... Magba^e pricelist ... discs 
from TDK ... edilor sounds off again. 

Dragon Soft 5 

Crazy Foota from Computape ... Galactic 

Gus from Quickbeam .., PC Convert From 
Compusense... Kararkazy from Preston,.. 
Biorhylhms from Occult... and a retro. 

Auto boot 8 

Jutian Osbourne puts the boot in — to 
DragonDOS. 

IWo extra commands 10 

R. G. Whittaker adds commands to invert 
and scroll to Dragon Basic. 

Scopy for SuperDOS 12 

Stuck with a single disc drive? Maftyn Ar- 
milage devises a routine to copy from di^c 
to disc under SuperDOS without lears. 

Down in the Dumps 16 

Just one this month, for the Tandy Dl^ P 110 
dot matrix printer. 



A composer at Ossett 18 

George and Jonathan Carfwright offer a 
personal viewof the Ossett show, and some 
helpful hints for Dragon Composer 

Winners and losers 19 

Goroon Lee looks at some of the entries to 
the May competition, and has a few (three 

letter) words to say about it. 

Expert's Arcade Arena 20 

Introducing the famous Hacking Sheet, by 
Paul Burgin. 

Write: ADVENTURE 22 

Is there something following you? If not. 
Pfete Gerrard tells you how to obtain one. 
and what to do with it. 

Adventure Drail 24 

Mike Gerrard tackles Tangtewood and 
Trekboer while singlehandedly beating off 
awasp- 

Competition 26 

How many angles in a triangle? Are you 
sure? Ask Gordon Lee 

Tlie Answer 27 

Gordon Lee's own solution to the July 
competition. 

Stop f>RESS4fT0P PRESS + STOP PRESS 

John Penn Software are organising a 6S09 
Show in London at the Great Hall, the Con- 
naught Rooms, Aldwych on Saturday 
December 5th. More news next month. 
Brian Cadge Is on hofiday. 



Editorial 



IT'S apologies month again this month. 
Everything will be resolved^ of course, by 
the time you read this, but I would just 
like you to know that my first thought, 
when I was told that Dragon User 
wouldn't be malted till the 7th 
September, was They'll lynch me in 
Rochdalel". 

What I can't tell you jystyet is whether 
they did lynch me in Rochdale. I can't 
even pleacf with 'em not to. It's too early 
for t on€ and too late for t'other All I can 
say isthat, well, we were a teeny bit Sate to 
the printers. Not two whole weeks tate, 
but, welS, late is late, isn't it? 

Trouble is, if you leave the office for a 
week, your hardworking friends and col- 
leagues can do one of two things: a) 
something or b) nothing, B) normally 
causes fewer problems. Normally. For- 
tunately, the ghost of the much missed 
Barhora^ who hid a few spare days rn the 
timetable, and the long suffering Arlext 
send us your discs and we'll show you 
what you can do with'em " made sure that 
we were stuck down and parcelled up 
rather less late than we would otherwise 
have been. 

By the way, its a little known fact that 
designers of computer mags gradually 
goinsane. There are only so many things 
you can do, visually that is. with little 
black boxes. Editors don't, of course („. 
burble.,.) 



Telephone number 

(All depaftmentsj 
437-4343 

Editor 

HELEN ARMSTRONG 

Production Editors 

DAVID PRIVETT/LINDASLOMAN 

Editorial Secretary 

CAROL FRITH 

Advertisement Manager 

ATHENA PEERMAN 

Administration 

ANNE MARIE ALLEN 

Marketing Manager 

HELEN PERRY 



Managing Editor 

PETER WORLOCK 

Publishing Director 

JENNY IRELAND 

Subscriptions 

UKei4for 12 issues 
Overseas (surface) £20 for 12 issues 
ISSN 02S5'177. Telex: 296275 
Dragon Oser^ 12/13 Little Newport Si reel. 
London WC 2 H7PP 

US address: c/o Business Press InlernationaL 
205 East 42rtd St. Mew York, NY lOTT? 
Published by Scot Press Ltd. 
^; Scot Press 1987 

Typesetting and Production byArt&xj Limited. 
London MWl. 

Print&d by Head ley Brothers Ltd. Ashford, Keral 
Registered a(the Posi Office as a newspaper. 
Dragon and its logoare trademarks of 
Eurohard Lid. 



How 10 submit artides 

The quaJity of the material we can publish in 
Dragon User each rTionth will, lo a very great ex- 
ten? depend an th& quality of the discoveries that 
you can make with your Dragon. The Dragon 
computer was launched on to the market with a 
powerful version of Basic, but with very poor 
documentation. 

Articles which are submitted to Dragon User 
for publication should not E:)e mores than 30O0 
words long. Ail submissions should be typed. 
Please leave wide margins and a double space 
between each fine. Programs should, whenever 
possible, be computer printed on plain white 
paper and be accompanied by a tape of the 
program. 

W& cannot guarantee to return every submit- 
ted article or program, so please i<eep a copy. If 
you wa nt to h a ve your p rog ram return ed you m ust 
include a stamped addressed envelope. 



Letters 



This is the chance to air your views — send your tips, compliments and complaints to Letters 
Page, Dragon l/ser, 12-13 Little Newport Street, London WC2H 7PP. 



Mystery 
draw 

WHILE reading DU August 
1986 I came across an iiem 
called Graphics by J . H . Piaster 
in Dragon Ansv^er&. So here is 
something for Mr. Pl-ester lo 
add to il: 

10PMODE2J:3CREEN 1.0 

20 POKE &HFF22. (PEEK 

f&HFF22)AND6) 

ii5 DATA 121.12.12.12.12.12, 

12.12,12,13,33 

30 GOTO 10 

QT 

20POKE&HFF22.(PEEK 

(&HFF23)AND6) 

or 

20POK£&HFF22,(PEEK 

(&HFF20)AND7) 

or 

20 POKE &HFF22,(PEEK 

(&HFF.1Q)AND8) 

or 

20POKE&HFF22,(PEEK 

(&HFF18)AND9) 

or 

20 POKE &HFF22,(PEEK 

(&HFF15)AND2) 

If there's any complaint&abour 

the above, please contact cr 

phone me. And could J. H. 

Ple^ler, and Simon df Crawley 

Hill Farm who wanted help 

with Syz/gy get in touch. 

Sorry, Simon. 

Paul {esikiewicz 

40, Sfdiay A\/entje 

Parr St. Hefens 

WA9 2BQ 
(St. Helens) 6 J 1627 (between 
4 and 4.30pm). 



Write-a-DOS? 

COMMERClALsupportforthe 
Dragon is not very good to put 
it mildly, although some in- 
teresting new names and 
items have appeared of late. 
One thing I have noticed 
though is if someone says 
there is a special need for 
some particular program or 
item , especially in your pages, 
it seems to spark somewhere 
an "I can produce thatl" from 
somewhere. 

So what's the point of this? 
Weil I have spotted a market 
gap and ! want someone to fill 
it. The books-on-a^^ything- 
compuser phase ended as the 
DRAGONDOS appeared on 
the scene, and the manual 



Every month we will be stielling out a game or twOt 

courtesy of Mlcrodeal^ to the reader/s ^^^^ 

who se nd th e m o St i n te re st i r^g or ^'s ^"^^X 

entertaining letters. So send 

us 

send us your hi-scores and 

suggestions. Send us your 

best Dragon stories. What 

dyou think we are, 

mind readers?! 



tertaining letters. So send t pyxR a / 

your hints and your opinions, ^^ ^^ ' ^^ ^ 
nd us your hi-scores and f PUFF J 



There's gold in them 
thar bills! 

AS new software is now almost extinct I would like lo pass on 
my experience of obtaining software direct from Canadia and 
America. Payment can easily be arranged on any of the major 
credit cards. 

1 ordered Ganteht and Paper Route from Canada by phone 
at about 9pm in the UK. Due to the time difference it was early 
aftemcon in Canada. The games took about 1 month to arrive. 
T hey bot h ra n wFt ho ut con version oo a D rago n 64 exce p I if yo u 
use the keyboard mode instead of using the joystick as the 
keyboard scan is different, although tJiis can be overcome by 
using different keys. 

The main drawback is that the games cost about £30 each 
including shipping. Custom duties and charges add another 
£5 when they enter this country. 

I hope the above i nf or maii o n rtiay p rove useful to any on e th in k- 
ing of ordering direct from an American or Canadian source.. 

R.K. Osborne 

WA Nofthdown Avenue 

CUnonvitle 

Kerjt 

CT9 2NW 

AND who has recently inherited their aunty's estates ... 

well that should stop folk complaining about the cost of 

new software here for a bit. 

Anyone who is this dedicated deserves one free tape, I 
reckon, but we would be interested to hear from anyone 
who has a (legitimate) method of getting compatible soft- 
ware from the USA without having to pay £35 a shot! 



supporting it is abysmal. I 
would like a good book on this 
peripheral, starting with sim- 
ple use and programming, ful- 
ly covering file handling in an 
easy to follow manner with 
plenty of short example pro- 
grams, and going on to 
memory maps eic. I am sure 
Ihere is more than one person 
out there with the knowledge 
and skill to write such a book, 
and a market for it once writ- 
ten. Perhaps Sunshine will 
lake you up and do the actual 
publishing??? If not I see no 
reason why \l needn't be in 
printed, photocopied, or 
duplicated form. You mighl 
even make a bil of money! 

Phitip Seed 

27 Findon Road 

Elson 

Gosport 

HantsPOl2 4EP 



WELL, money is something 
there isn't a lot of about, as 
we all know^ but you never 
know, do you? Just out of 
idle curiosity, is there 
anyone out there who has 
the onions to write a book 
like this? 



Out of print 

HAVING read with interest 
your review Take Ten Printars 
in the July edition of Dragon 
User I was very impressed 
with the reporl on the Tandy 
DMP105 by Ian Martin. He 
suggested that the com- 
petitive price is £120, but has 
since been reduced to £99.95. 
With this information in mind I 
paid visit to my local Tandy 
shop. I asked the salesman if 



I might see the DMP105 at 

work, to which he replied. 
"Sorry! That model was 
discontinued at Christmas.' 
The printer has been replaced 
by the DMP106. but the price 
has increased considerably to 
E169-95. 

The review now seemed 
rather pointless and as you 
can imagine I am very 
disappointed, 

Now after the complaint' 
please can you give any infor- 
mation as to where I may ob- 
tain Buzzard Bait hy Tom Mix? 
The only copy I have seen 
locally is at Tandy's and that 
was for the CoCo and would 
not even load into the Dragon. 
As this is one of the games 
recently under review by 
Dragon User. I wondered if you 
can supply a source? 

Dennis Wright 

37 Moor Drive 

Alv^ston 

Derby DE2 ODQ 

NOW, dang my eyes, but Til 
be darned if I can find a 
review of Buzzard Bait 
around the old place just 
now. There's one in my 
brown paper bag ... perhaps 
we'll run it. But the word is 
that Microdeal, who used to 
sell it, no longer do so, so 
unless you can beg, borrow 
or steal one, it's no longer 
available. 



Help with old 
WP? 



I HAVE recently been ex- 
perimenting with Coding the 
Words, Peier Whittaker's 
Word processor in the 
September 1965 issue of 
Dragon User. I think it is an ex- 
cellent program and if more 
software like this had been 
available commercially earlier 
on, the Dragon would shil be 
selling in its thousands today. 
However, I have two pro- 
blems and would be grateful if 
Peter or one of your other 
readers could assist. Firstly. I 
am not a very good touch typist 
and would like to increase the 
auto repeat delay so that I do 
not repeeeeeeated leeeeet- 
ters; is there some location I 
can POKE with a longer delay? 
The second problem is more 
difficult, when I save to disc, 
after entering the B character 



2 Dragon User October 1987 



file name followed by (ENTER ) 
the disc motor starts, the busy 
light comes on . the head moves 
and it stays lil<e this for 10 
miffcutes or more until I press the 
:;RESET> button; on checking 
the directory, no file has been 
written , If I try to load a file, any 
file, the program crashes with 
an FM error. I presume that 
Pete r uses a d if fere nt d isc con - 
t roller and that he is making 
calls to routines which reside in 
different locations. I should be 
most grateful for any help in 
CO n vei"t i ng t he prog ram , eve n if 
it i s on ly a 1 i St of the disc r ou tine 
calls used by Peter 

Mrs Bernice Hennessy 

The Firs 

8 TowcesterRd 

Btis\/\fQrth Northampton 
NN73BL 

UNFORTUNATELY, we have 
lost touch with Peter after ef- 
forts to locate him. Perhaps 
another reader can help. 



Double 
spaced Stylo 

I am a Spanish member of the 
OS- 9 User Group and subs- 
criptor of ycurgocd magazine. 
I write you about the article of 
David Rothery and the correc- 
tion of the double space prin- 
ting with the Stylograph 
program. 

Well, making the change 
that he proposes the printing is 
correct with both Stylo and 
MM:. But if you try to use the 
MM with the screen, it doesn't 
work properly and in addition 
both programs dfon't respond 
to the Xmode set ups. 

The problem of the double 
space printing, in both pro- 
grams, comes from the use of 
a system calling. The charac- 
ters are sent to the printer one 
by one, with a l$Wnte calling. 
This calling doesn't allow line 
editing, and to end a line it is 
necessary to send a CR + LF 
sequence. This causes the 
double space printing ignoring 
the Xmode setups. 

To avoid this dreaded pro- 
blem I have changed the 
iSWrite calling by a iSWritLn, 
which allows line editing, and I 
have n u 1 1 i f I ed t h e LF seq ue nee 
with NOP instructions. With 
this change in both programs 
the printing is correct on the 
printer and the screen, and 
always follows the Xmode set 
up conditions. 

This IS the process to make 
the changes with the systems 



disc (with the Debugger) in /DO 
and the Stylo in /D1 : 
DEBUG 

SLOAD/di/cmds/stylo 

L stylo 

.. + 012E 

= 8C 

L stylo 

. . + 3F4F 

= 12 

= 12 
= 12 
Q 

SAVE /dl /cmds/stylo.mod stylo 
DEL/dVcrnds/stylo 
VERIFY U </d1/cmds/stylo. 
mod )/d1/cmds/stylo 
DEL /d1 /cmds/stylo.mod 
ATTR /d1/cmds/stylo e pe 
The process for the Mail Merge 
is the same with the addresses 
-hOOFSand +191D. 

I hope that this change will be 
a definitive solution for this pro- 
blem. Apologies tor my English. 
Thanh you for you attention. 
Pedro M. Pascuat Uriguen 
SantBines KbIbb 6-B 
20600 Eibar (Gipuzkoa) 
EuskadI Spain 



Quick Tally 
mod 

I WAS very interested to read 
your article on printer and I myself 
ow n t he M ann esm an Tal ly 80 + 
and have found the variety of 
print modes and character sets to 
be very useful in writing technical 
reports for my degree course at 
the local polytechnic. 

II can be found, if thetopocver 
is removed . th at o n the I eft un der 
the ir>put card are two sockets 
merited Ram 1 & Ram 2, the card 
is held i n place by two screws and 
should be removed by lifting it 
d i rectly u pwards as it is plu gged 
into the board below, now if two 
51 16 memory chips are fitted in 
these soc kets then the in p ut buf- 
fer will be increased to 4K (as op- 
posed to on ly 11 2 bytes wh i ch is 
the standard). The cost of the 
ch i ps is only about £4 . 50 and this 
included the postage and putting 
the chips into the sockets can be 
done by all but the very clumsiest 
of oafs. 

I hope this information will be 
of interest to your readers. 

C. Hftchmson 

2 Newingtof^ Rd 

BsechwQod 

Middlesbrough 

CtevBfand rS4 3ED 

PS I bought the chips from Gran- 
data Ltd. for El .60p + VAT + 50p 
postage. The address can be 
found in Practical Etectronics. 



Better video? 

SINCE the Dragon came out, 
people are trying to upgrade it 

to give it a better video perfor- 
mance. The Tandy Coco has 
managed it by having a raster 
memory system by Motorola in- 
stalled, the Dragon got stuck by 
having an out of date video 
system. 

Compusense with its 
upgrade board had better used 
the N EC722p instead of an out 
of date MC6e45, then when all 
is in RAM, one could modify the 
Basic to use the 7220 to full 
potential: 

a) 1 28 columns x 72 lines, more 
then A4 page [using an A4 or 
double A4 monitor by ETAP, 
Belgium) 

b) High resolution of 768 x 576 
pixels, better than Atari ST or 
Amiga or IBM PS/2 

c) Using analog video, 
unlimited colours, CAD/CAM 
possibiiities. 

d) 1 28K Video RAW used by the 
7220 only, not interfering with 
the Dragon'sown 64K, etc.. or 
having a complete new RAM 
board of 1Mb. 

For quite a while a British firm 

called Micro Concepts has had 

another solution: Microbox II. 

One ca n rde r i i as a k it or as 

a complete package, take your 

pick Jhey can be reached at 2 

St. Stephen Road, Chelten^ 

ham, Giouoestershire GL5 

1AA. phone (0242) 51 0525. 

Maarten 'AMJ' Van Wamel&n 

3 Lynmetestraat 

Oedeiem 3330 

Beigium 



Cluster 
correction 

THANK you for publishing the 
article Into the Directory in the 
May issue, and for the program 

ReadDD. 

However I feel I should point 
out to Paul Dalgleish, a 
misunderstanding he has. He 
comments that the device 
descriptors are set up for 8 sec- 
tor c I ustens and so Dragon discs 
will not readdifectly. In fact the 
OS-9 de V i ce d escri pto rs do n ot 
contain any reference to the 
cluster size. This is chosen by 
the format program and whtten 
onto the identification sector of 
thedisc. The byte Mr Dalgleish 
specifies to change should 
have no effect at all on the 
operation of the program. The 
byte referred to is called the 
^Segment Allocation Size' and 



isthe minimum number of sec- 
tors allocated to a f i I e . See page 
6-4 [4th paragraph) or the OS-9 
Systems Programmers 
Manual. If the file is shorter that 
8 sectors then when the file is 
c I ose d , these e xt ra secto rs a re 
de-alloc ated f rom t h e f i I e. If you 
have two or mo re f i les o p e n f o r 
writing simultaneously and you 
have altered the device descrip- 
tor as M r Dalgleish suggest you 
could get a 'Segment List Full' 
error d ue to excess i ve f ragm e n- 
tation of the files. This byte is 
therefore best left as it is. The 
program ReadDD works 
perfectly well anyway. 

To check the cluster size, try 
using the FREEcommand. This 
displays the cluster size 
amongst its output. 

P D Smith 

University Hall 

Bifchwood Road 

Penylan 

Cardiff 

CF2 5YB 



Thanks and a 
favour... 

FIRSTLY may I thank yourselves 
for your backing and continual 
support for Dragon owners. It is 
organisations such as yours 
that help keep our family of 
together. 

Next I wouEd like to thank the 
Hardware and Software Busi- 
n esses for supplying these 
owners with their necessary fod- 
der if you will excuse the term. 

Finally 1 must congratulate all 
the owners of Dragon and Tan- 
dy (never forget the Tandy 
owners) Machines for not discar- 
ding [heir computers in pursuit of 
poxy (forgive me if 'poxy' is a bit 
strong) machines such as 
Sinclair — say no more. Atari 
etc.. It is the owners themselves 
whom deserve congratulating as 
they keep a computer alive and 
I am sure they will continue to 
support their suppliers. 

Could I please ask you to print 
my name and address along with 
this letter so f can get in touch 
with other Dragon owners and 
swap games, tips, and for the 
fem ale CO ntiingent — telephone 
numbers? 

Ste\/e Ctemerjts 

397 The Heathway 

Shard End 

Birmingham 

B34 60N 

WHY'S that, ay? Fink only the 
bi rtf s have te lephones do y er? 
What about us chaps, then? 
Ay? Ay? 



October 1987 Dragon User 3 



News desk 



New disc set to 
chart 














THE lady with a 3 inch disc 
cHnging to her ear is part of a 
new advertising campaign by 
TDK, aiready weil known for 
tlieir video and audio cassette 
tapes. 

TDK Inaven't made itciear yet 
winetlner tine new range wili in- 
clude 3.25in o-r 5in discs, but 
TDK magnetictape is already a 
byword for good q uality, so they 
could become a major force in 
tine disc market in future. 

BiJt th ey a re not I i kely tc start 
any trends in the earring 
business. 



Dragon User back issues 



FOLLOWING the launch of 
Pulser Software's database pro- 
gram M&gbase, wi th an optional 
Dragon L^5-er index, tinis seems 
like a good time lo prinl a list of 
DU back issue still available. 

We have small quantities 
(under 20 copies) of the 
following- 
August 1933, December 
1983. February 1984, March 
19B4. May 1984. June 1984, 
Aug ust 1984. September 1984. 
October 1984, November 1984. 
January 1985, February 1985. 
March 19B5, June 1985. 
November 1985, January 1086, 
February 1986. March 1986. 
May 1986, 

We have substantial quan- 
tities (over 50 copies) of 
September 1965, December 
1985, April 1986. August 1986, 
September 19&6. October 1936. 
November 1986. December 



1986 (whicii contains adverts 
from virtually every supplierstili 
in tJie Dragon market, including 
one or two recent drop-outs, and 
as such is a useful work of 
reference) and all 1987 issues. 

We have a very small number 
of September 1983, November 
1903. January 19B4. April 1984, 
July 1984 and July 1986. Don^t 
orde r t hose — d r op th e E d itor a 
line if you want copies, and we 
will check with the warehouse 
a nd lei you kn o w, af te r wh ic h we 
wifl deal with any orderson af irst 
com e f J rst serve bas is. T h i s w i I ) 
help us to avoid losing track of 
orders for issues which may or 
may not be in stock. 

Backnumbers of Dragon 
User cost £1.25 regardless of 
quantity or rarily! Please send 
any orde rs to t he u su a I ad d ress, 
making payments out to Scot 
Press Ltd„ 



Magbase price list 



HERE isafull list of pricesfor the 
different versions of Pulser Soft- 
ware's Magbase: 

Tape version: El .99; disc ver- 
sion: £2.99; tape version with 
Dragon User files: E2.99; disc 
version with Dragon t/ser files: 
£3,99; Dragon Us&f hard copy 
only: £1.99; tape version + DU 
files + Du hard copy: £3,99; disc 
version h- DU files + hard copy: 
£4.99. Post and packing is50'P, 
except forthe DU hard copy on- 
ly, where it is 25p. Overseas 



postage is £1. 2 S. 

Cheques should be crossed 
and made payable to Pulser 
Software at 36 Foxhill, High 
Cromplon, Shaw. Oldham, 
Lanes OL2 7NQ. 

The disc versions are 
available for DragonDos, 
Cum ana Dos 2,0 and Delta 
Dos, so specify which version 
you want. 

We understand thatthereare 
also index files available for 
Dragon Update. 



Solver 
Steps 
Out 



SIMON The Solver' Hargrave 
would like to announce the 
release of his new range of 
adventure games. 

^As I have the reputation of 
The Solver' you will not expect 
th e m to be easy! ' writes Si mon . 
The titles are as follows: 

Stare rash — a space ad ven- 
ture in which you are trapped on 
a hostile planet with a sinisher 
secret. 

Th€ King's Quest — an in- 

d i rect cont i n uat ion of Starcrash'. 
You are trapped in a castle on 
1 2th century Earth at the mercy 

of a mad king. 

The Quest for the Meaning 
of Life— You have control over 
four characters, and must use 
them to find the answer to the 
meaning of life. 

All the games will run on a 
Dragon 32 or 64. Simon is cur- 
rently worl<ing on Tandy conver- 
sions. The gannes all have 
mobile creatures and play in 
real time, except Starcrash, 
which uses mock real time, 

There are various little addi- 
tions to the keyboard parset, in- 
cluding a orange/green option 
from t he Break key, an d a pri nte r 
history of your moves by using 
SHIFT and the UP arrow. But 
again, rtoXonSt^rcrash. 

The adventures cost £5 each 
(rncluding post and packing. 
Al 1 w 28 d ays for d el i ve ry ) f ro m 
Simon Hargrave, Crawley Hill 
Farm. Uley, Dursley. Glos. GL11 
5BH. 

Simon also sells solution 
sheets for many adventures. 
They cost 20p each. Send an 
SAE to Simon for more 
information . 



Missing 
person 

WE'RE still hoping Mr. John 
Carmel will contact us about 
another reader who was tryi ng 
to get a letter to him. 



Editor 

adjusts 

eyeshade 

SI NCe I have a couple of spare 
column inches this looks Eike a 
good time for me, your Editor, to 
offer both an apology and an ap- 
peal to DU's loyal and patient 
subscribers. The subject of en- 
quihesfrom beleaguered users 
raised its head today in theform 
of a mild grumble from one 
read e r wh o had "se nl i n q uer ies 
With the appropriate 'coupon 
but neither were printed or 
acknowledged", and another 
from a h opef u I wh o h ad e nc I os ■ 
ed an Adventure Trail coupon 
with a stamped self-addressed 
envlope. asking for a reply. 

Well, nothing makes mehap- 
pierthan a reader whocontacts 
t h is off ice wi th a heart f u 1 1 of woe, 
and goes away happy, as the 
lucky ones will testify. If we get 
a letter — or a ca 1 1 , b ut letters a re 
more Ifkely to reach the right 
person — and we can supply 
t he a ns we r, th e n we pi \y wel I do, 
even if we have to sit on it for a 
Ion g t i me. An d if none of the con- 
tributors can supply an answer 
directly, enquiries are re-routed 
to Communications. Ad\^Bntur& 
Helpline or the letters page 

BUT 

The Dragon is a l^ittle 
m ag az i ne with a I itil e staff (m ost 
of t hose g ood pec pie wi t h th ei r 
names on the flannel panel run 
the company rather than the 
magazine) and for this reason 
we have never, ever, at least not 
since wel! before my time, 
undertaken to reply personally 
to letters, no matter how many 
SAEsarrivewith'em.Nordowe 
run any kind of coupon system 
for replies. Everything which ar- 
rives h&re on a COMMS or 
ADHELP coupon gets listed in 
the next available issue of 
Dragon User, just like it says on 
thecoupon. After thai, it's in the 
hands of you , gentle readers. 

Likewise, Mr Gerrard is the 
o nly on e of our cont ribu to rs who 
offers a readers^ service, and 
that only in voives the adventure 
help sheets. This is still strictly 
at his discretion, because the 
Mine Workers and Computer 
Journalists Act of 1933 states 
that we are not allowed to keep 
workers in adeep dark hole and 
make them slave for a pittance 



4 Dragon User October 1987 



It you have any new products for the Dragon — software or hardware 
ring the News Desk on 01-437 4343 



until their fingers drop off. We 
do it anyway, but we have to 
keep up appearances. 

Gordon Lee isn't allowed to 
discuss competition results 
with anyone (which is the 
universal rule for competition 
organisers), and although he 
has been known to courteous- 
ly apologise for our typos, 
these are normally corrected 
in subsequent issues. 

The appearance of a 
'Secretary' on our front page 
leads a few hopeful souls to 



picture me, feet on desk, 
carelessly dictating missives 
to a fast-fingered assistant. 
Wrong. The fast-fingered 
assistant is tied up typing out 
this your regular magazine for 
the typesetters, in between 
answering the phone and be- 
ing shouted at by people who 
want stationery. She is con- 
cerned with nothing so humble 
as typing letters. If I want a let- 
ter typed, I type it myself. If the 
W/P isn't tied up on official 
business. Which is why those 



of you whodogeta reply usual- 
ly get a comp slip scribbled in 
what looks like red bfro. (It's ac- 
tually blood flowing from under 
my careworn fingernails. Jou r- 
nalists always write in their 
own blood, because its cheap, 
refi I liable, and doesn't need a 
requisition.) 

So, we are sorry we can't of- 
fer a slicker readers' serv/ice. 
but it was a choice between 
getting another assistant or 
keeping the magazine on, 
y 'see... we will go on coping 



with as many queries as we 
can. Please don't feel neglec- 
ted if you don't hear from us 
personally. And yes, it js worth 
chasing if you have something 
you are concerned about, in 
case it has gone astray. 'Write, 
or cairn' leave a message. Live 
dangerously! But don't ask 
them where I am. Some things 
It is better for humankind not to 
know, and they usually don't. 
Now if you'll excuse me, I 
must go and write a coop I e of 
letiers. 



Dragonsoft 



A PC when you need 

one 



New software for review should be sent to Dragon User 
12.13 Little Newport Street, London WC2H 7PP. 



Program: Dragon/PC Conven 
Supplier: Compusense 
Price: £24.95 

HOME computers have been 
around fong enough now for 
ever yon e to h ave see n , played . 
a nd u su al ly I ost i nie rest in . most 
forms of computer game. Hav- 
ing exhausted the seemingly 
endless supply of games, most 
people sit down and begin to 
wonder to what practical use 
they can put their beloved micro 
to. It is at this time that most peo- 
ple real ise that for any ' real ' ap- 
plication the Dragon has many 
shortcomings such as poor 
communications ability, awful 
screen display, slow working 
speed, lack of software etc. . and 
with the increasing number of 
desk-top computers finding 
thei r way into offices, more and 
more people are becoming 
aware of just what is possible 
with a decent micro. Ii is due to 
these and other reasons that 
many home computer users are 
either using their Dragons to 
pro p d 00 rs ope n a nd f org ett i n g 
computers completely or are 
going out and buying 
something with a little more 
Whoomph. 

The popular choices at the 
moment seem to be either the 
Atari STs or the ubiquitous IBM- 
PC or one of its many clones. 
But there are asmall number ot 
people who still keep the old 
Dragon handy simply because 
they have so much software or 
data for it. Having had to change 
computers several ti mes in the 
past myself, I know that it can be 



very frustrating when you face a 
programming problem to which 
you al ready h ave th e so I ut ion on 
an bid' machine. Well now 
thanks to Com pu sense's PC 
Conve/t packages it is a simple 
matte r f o r y o u to copy t hem o ve r 
to your new pride and joy(?). 

T he re are c u r rently two Con- 
^rf packages available, one will 
transfer DragonDOS files 
(either dBASic or TeXT) to the 
IBM PC or one of its many com- 
patibles. The packages are so 
easy to use that there is little to 
say about them! 

Using Convert program 
couldn't be easier, you simply 
boot the PC and run it. A menu 
is displayed givi ng options that 
allow you to select the target 
path -name, target disc drive 
number, show the source disc 
directory etc., make your 
choices, put the Dragon- 
DOS/Fle.)^DOS disc in one PC 
d r i ve. a form atted PC d isc i n t he 
other drive and make your 
selection from the disc directory 
displayed. Th ed rives whrrr, the 
cursor blinks, and voila! your 
precious file is now available as 
a PC format te)<t file. 

For som eon e mov i ng u p (?) to 
a P C these prog ra ms a re s i m p- 
ly essential. Those of you who 
have decided to stay with your 
Dragon will not be interested in 
this review anyway (And I don't 
care!), if you have bought a PC 
then buy PC Com^n\ 

Roy CoatBS 



Put your left arm 



up. 



Program: CfezyFoota 
Supplier: Computape 
Price: £2 99 

Notes: Available on cassette 
and Dragon DOS [for Dragon 32 
and 64. Requires two players. 

IT was ve ry a p p ro p r iate th at this 
game should arrive on the day 
th at t he E ngl is h foot bal I seaso n 
kicks off. If there's anyone out 
there who hasn't twigged yet, 
then ril tell you that Crazy Focte 
is a football game. OK? 

It Is also an unusual football 
gam e. i n th at it 's n ot I i ke Cham- 
pions or Footbal! Manager, 
where you decide the club's 
moves and if all goes well and 
theodds are on your side you'll 
have a good chance of winning . 
I n Crazy FootB y o u co nt rol you r 
team and battle away with the 
other team, controlling all the 
players and scoring all the 
goals. 



The object of the game is to 
score as many goals as you can 
against youropponent within a 
set time. To select a player, you 
move an arrow on your side of 
the screen using a joystick, then 
left/right to move the player This 
proc ess takes a wh i le to m aster. 
The fire botton kick is the ball in 
the di rection which the joystick 
is facing. This allows you to pass 
the bailor shoot. 

The game is played in 
PM0DE4, and bee a use the re is 
nocoiouritishardtodistinguish 
between your own players and 
the opposition. However, if you 
look closely one team has its 
right hands up in the air, and the 
other team h as its left h a nd s u p, 
which makes all the players look 
as if they afe about to do a 
Highland Fling. 

There are eleven players in 
eachteam, which means 22 




ow^' 





SCnPiE 5000 E3CDPte' 




QDOD EILDCH QQQQ 




^ '- ppiESEhira ^ ! 




»*ClPiFlZV % 




1 A - A 




It K 




% K <\ 




; ! It K 











October 1987 Dragon User 5 



Dragonsoft 



New software for review should be sent to Dragon User 
12-13 Little Newport Street, London WC2H 7PP. 



figures packed into one little 
screen. This does get a mite 
confusing. 

The graphics are simple but 
nice, and the players look sur- 
prisingly like Jack (from 
B^anstatk&f). The title music is 
also fairly simple. The cheers 
from the crowd sound like a 
constipated cat. 

There are a number of faults 
in the game which spoil an 
otherwise enjoyable program. 
Firstly^ Ihe goals are larger 
than the goalie, which means 
that you can score by shooting 
diagonally o^er his head or 
under his legs. It sounds fair 
but it is annoying„ Secondly, 
you can walk straight into a 
player and lake the bafi away 
from him. This is especially an- 
noying when it's the opposi- 
tion's keeper who is the culprit, 
because he can walk straight 
into your goal leaving you 
unable to catch up. Finally, 



because you can walk through 
a player, it is possible to walk 
through the other keepers 
goals while he is standing in 
them, and he cannot block 
your way {or you his). You 
simply push him further into 
the goals, and there's nothing 
you can do about it 

It's nice to see Computape 
release something new by 
themsel\/es. although the 
presentation is rather ama- 
teurish. The inlay is made up of 
a thin piece of yellow paper 
with a phnt of a screen shot. 
How about a bit of colour witli 
some proper pictures! Apart 
fro m t he said p roble ms , I f ou nd 
the game very enjoyable and 
it is well worth the price of 
£2.99. 

Donald Morrison 




Program: Kamakarzy 
Supplier: R&A Preston 
Price: £2 99 

TH IS is a version of the old ar- 
cade game where you have to 
collect all the flags in a maze in- 
habited by the othercars which 
are out to kill you ('Kamakarzy 
drivers') H your only defence is to 
release clouds of smoke from 
yourcar. You have to watch your 
fuel guage or else your car will 
meet with a sticky end, thankful- 
ly there are fuel cans dotted 
about the screen. As in the ar- 
cade the screen scrolls as you 
look for the flags. On later levels 
there are more obstacles and 
even more mad drivers out to 
get you! On screen 2 there are 
giant cabbages which block the 
ro u tes to t h e f I ags ar>d m ake I i fe 
that bit harder. 

Everything in thi^s game is 
don e profess i on a I ly ; t he c a r e)?:- 
plodes th e n t he rem a i n i ng parts 
spins round when you die, the ti- 
tle screen has a very good lu ne 
w hie h CO m p I e men ts t he sc reen 
an d eve n t he way you enter t he 
name in the hi-score table is 
easy to do. When you load the 
game you sh ou Id stic k wit h it as 
it hasn't crashed but is suppos- 
ed to load that way. 

Even though this quite and 
old game it is still worth every 
penny. 

Stephen Cogan 



b 




Life is f uii 
of iittie 
ups and 
downs 



Program: Biorhythms 
Supplier: Occult Software 
Price: No information 



BlORHYTHMSareoneof those 
th i ng s I h at I i he ho roscopes yo u 
e it her believe i n or y o u d o n1 . For 
th ose t h at don ' t h now, tol I o wers 
of biorythms maintain that the 
three main facets of your per- 
sonality (intellect, emotions and 
physical wel l-bei ng) go t h roug h 
"cycles' during which time they 
vary in strength. The lengths of 
these cycles differ in that the 
cycles are of 3 3, 28 a nd 23 d ays 
duration respectively hence the 
n eed for a com p ute r to calcu I ate 
their current positions. 

The program comes on 
cassette wit h a se r i es of p r i n te r 
drivers on side A for Epson. 
Seikosha GPlOOA and Shinwa 
CP8Q. The S/or/ry/rtms- prog ram 
itself IS on side two and having 
loaded starts by giving you a 
choice of foreground and 
background colours (black, buff 
and green since it is all in 
PM ODE4) a nd th en as ks for t he 



'subjects' name and date of 
birth. Having entered this initial 
i nfo rm alio n yo u m ay t he n ente r 
the 'target' month that you wish 
the biorythms to be calculated 
for. Th is is w h e re t h e f u n starts. 

The program begins by 
calculating thenumberof days 
t h at have elapsed si nee t h e b i r- 
thdate and the target month 
LAST YEAR. (Allowances are 
made for leap years). The pro- 
gram then goes on to add the 
number of days month by month 
until the target month is reach- 
ed. Eventually (and I mean 
EVENTUALLY), a graph is 
drawn for the target month 
showi ng the stat u s of eac h of t he 
three cycles and showing the 
'critical' days at which time 
th ings are at a n al 1 1 i m e low. You 
have the option to print the 
graph or to go on and get the 
biorythms for the next month 
but that is IT 

If ^ou are a biorythm believer 
then the information shown will 
make you very happy. I am not 
a believer and so the output of 
th e p rog ram is as exc i ti ng to me 
as an em ply bee r ca n , [not a bad 
analogy that eh? since I don't 
posess Jason's literary wit, 
when God was dishing that out 
Jason was at the front of the 
queue and I was in beer tent!}, 
but what annoyed me was the 
fact that the progam shows all of 
its calculations one step at a 
time and after each step you 
must press a key to continue to 
the next. 

This would not normally be 
loo bad but because the steps 
are shown on the hi-res screen 
using an immeasurably slow 
text driver I found myself 
reading the paper and occa- 
sionally nudging the space-b^r 
with my elbow. 

T he prog ram i s very neat and 
has obviously had a lot of hard 
work p ut i nto it but it s i m p ly takes 
loo long to get tothefinal screen 
th at sh ows th e i nf orm at i on t hat 
you bought the program for 
Before the letters page starts 
buzzing with insults thrown in 
my direction,! am not criticising 
Biorhythms, that is your choice, 
my comments are only directed 
at the programming. 

I f Biorhythms a re you r c u p of 
tea then this program will do 
whatyouwantitto. Itwilijustdo 
it slowly that's all- 



44>4 



Roy Coates 



Gus goes 
gambiing 
tlirougii 
space 



Program: Gataaic Gus 
Supplier: Quick beam 
Price: £4 00 

THIS review is of a standard 
game and. unfortunately. I did 
not even have the usual 
Quickbeam sheet that accom- 
panies their games. When I first 
Lried Galactic Gus I absolutely 
hated it. I was losing all of my 
eight lives within seconds of 
starting and felt very dejected. 

Having persisted with it I am 
hooked on it and spend quite a 
lot of time trying to sort our the 
many problems facing Gus. the 
f i gh ter pilot who is searc h i ng for 
fuel pods to refuel his fighter so 
that he can rejoi n t he Spacesh i p 
Drago n . H e is seated on a rocket 
chair and has to be steered 
round laser doors, creatures 
and other suprises. 

This is not a zap-em type 
game but one has to be very 
sK i 1 1 f u I to a voi d th e creatu res on 
many of the 215 screens as you 
move th roug h th e maze t ry in g to 
find fuel. The type of maze in- 
voJ ved is not too u n I ike Dark Pit. 
There are also bananas and 
small white objects, and I have 
seen a key (but can't yet reach 
it) which must be taken to the 
keyhole to reach further 
screens. 

Once you have mastered how 
to a voi d t he c reatu res try I n vis i - 
ble Land where you can see the 
creatures but "Gus is invisible. 
For the hackers there is a com- 
bination to be entered to get 
further 

The graphics on this game 
are nothing special at allbut for 
£4 you are presented with a 
series of challenges which will 
keep even the most adept busy 
for many hours. Not a classic 
game but certainly good value 
for money and containing a 
variety of problems some of 
which I have not even come 
across. 

First printed in Dragon Update 



Mike Stott 




6 Dragon User October 1987 



Dragonsoft 



New software tor review should be sent to Dragon User 
12-13 Little Newport Street, London WC2H 7PP. 



Valuable archaeological artefacts 
discovered by explorers in Delta 



Pmgram: Toolkits Scribe 
Supplier: Premier 

Microsystems 

Price; No Longer Available 

ALTHOUGH tiie demise of 

Premier was some time ago, I 
decided thai other Dragon 
own ers (i n panic u I ar Delta DOS 
users), should know about the 
excelle nt software th at t he do m- 
pany produced- 1 fee! they never 
got th e recog n i lion t hey d eserv- 
ed at the tifne and this might 
have been a reason for iheircoJ- 
lapse. Both of these products 
must be used in conjunction 
with DeHaOOS. 



TOOLKIT 

This comes in the form oF an 
EPROM fitted in side your DOS 
CO nt ro 1 1 er. I ca n al most hear you 
say'AHIButyoucanlbuythem 
any more.. .let alone get one fit- 
ted!". Well I iried and I tried lo 
findasupplier and almost gave 
up trying, but in theend I found 
a very helpful person who was 
kind enough to supply an 
EPROM for me AND fit it. TOOL- 
KIT gives the user 60 extra 
Basic commands and func- 
tions. I have condensed a 
description of these below. 
There are 24 low-res screens 
available to the user also. 



AUTOx.y — Gives auto malic 
line numbering from x in in- 
crements of y 

BEEP — Produces one single 
tone through normal sound 
channel 

BEEP n — Produces n tones 
BEEP ON — Produces a single 
tone every lime a key is pressed 
BEEP OFF — Slops the above 
BLOCKx,y.a,b,z.s — Draw 
block, start x,v, length a, height 
b. character z.screen s 
BREAK ON/OFF — Disable 
and enable the break key 
CAPPEND — Append a 
cassette program from tape 
CDIR — zproduces a fully com- 
prehensive lape directory 
CLSx.s — Fill screen s with 
character x 

DEEK/DOKE - Double byie 
equivalents to PEEK & POKE 
ECHOx-y,z — Copy lines x to y 



to line 2 onwards 
ENCA = /ENCB= — Set 
enclosure characlers for 
SEARCH a REPLACE 
ERL — Returns line where an 
error was encouniered 
ERR — Ret u rns a gen e rated er- 
ror code 

ERROR n — Simulate error 
number n 

ERROR GOTO n — Golo line 
number n when error occurs 
ERROR OP F — Til rn off a! I error 
trapping 

E. — Edit last line entered 
E.n — Edit line n 
E, — Edit next line 
E; — Edit Irne previous to E. 
FRAMEx,y.&.b.c..s — Draw an 
open rectangle as per BLOCK 
FREES — Display amount of 
string space remaining 
GOSUB n — Variable controll- 
ed GOSUB 

GOTO n — Variable controlled 
GOTO 

HANG ™ Halts program until a 
key is pressed 

HOME — Returnsthecursor to 
top left without clearing screen 
HLINx,y.a,z.s — Draw hohzon- 
tal line start x.yjength 
a.character z, screen s 
INKEY — SameaslNKEYSbut 
returns ASCII value 
I NPn, AS — Controlled input of 
length n, into variable A$ 
INP@sc.n.A$ — As INP but to 
specif ic screen location sc 
KEVSS — Auto-repeal 
keyboard scan — returns with 
character 

KEY — As KEYS but returns 
ASCII value of key pressed 
LlMIT= — Sei the delimiter 
character for SEARCH and 
REPLACE 

LOOK x.y.s — PEEK at screen 
location x,y on screen s 
LVARS — Give a list lo the 
printer of active variables in a 
program 

MOVE x,y — Move contents of 
screen x to screen y 
OLD — Attempt lo recover a 
NEWED ot crashed program 
PAGE — List program in con- 
trolled chunks 

PAD SE n — Cause program to 
pause n milliseconds 
PLAN — Suite of printer 
commands 

PROG X — Program definable 
keys A- H (shifted) 
PROG 1 — Define printer 



header 

PRUNE — Removes all 
statements foil owing a REM or ' 
RDATA X , A$ — Read x items of 
DATA into A$ 

REPLACE^xVy' — Replace x 
with y in program at users 
descretion 

REPLACE^x'Y— As above but 
does all occurences without 
asking 

RESU ME — Resume pnogram 
from error statement 
RESUME NEXT — Resume 
program from statement after 
error 

RESU ME GOTO n — Resume 
program at line n 
SEARCH 'x^ — Search for all oc- 
curences of X in a program 
SET x.y.z,s — Fill singte col- 
umn/row address x.y with 
character z, screen s 
SWOP x,y — Swop contents of 
screens X and y 
TRACE ON/OFF — Same as 
TRON except output goes to top 
right of screen 

VARS — Displays a list of active 
variables in a program 
VLIN x,y,a,z,s— Drawa vertical 
li ne start x,y, height a.character 
z.screen s 

WfLD= — Set wild card 
character for SEARCH function 



As you can see, this is an ex- 
cellent utility and you might be 
surprised to know that the 
above list is not the end of the 
story? TOOLKIT also provides a 
Screen Editor, which can be us- 
ed on its own or with the 
Dragons line editor If anyone 
has used a BBC micro, theyll 
k now w h at t y pe of ed i tor th is i s. 
Basically you use certain keys to 
move a cursor around and 
another key to copy everything 
that falls under the cursor. The 
difference here is that you can 
put text onto a temporary 
screen, edit it without disturbing 
your main listing and then return 
to the first screen. BRILLIANT! 



SCRIBE 

This is quite simply a hi-res text 
g e ner ator. Th e dsf f eren ce i s t hat 
it f u 1 1 V I nteracts wit h t h e D rag on 
bas ic/D e ItaDOS. i n ot he r wo rd s 
yo u can w r ite you r progr a ms u s ■ 



ing it. It is supplied on disc and 
therefore it is bootable. By using 
control codes, you can perform 
special tasks such as selecting 
inverse characters and chang- 
ing the colour set. the screen 
area is increased to 42 x 24 
character density and again ful- 
ly interfaces with BASIC, 
although you cannot poke 
characters to the text screen as 
is usual with programs of this 
type. A very useful feature has 
been added to allow you to 
generate new characters from 
within a pmgram. ..the PRINT! 
command. The character set 
also inlcudes quite a few 
graphics characters such as 
playing card symbols etc and it 
can be saved for later retrieval. 
Another new command is the 
PUT@- command . allowing you 
to precision place characters on 
the graphics screen. This is ex- 
tremely useful when dealing 
with subscripts and 
superscripts- 

The only failing of this soft- 
ware is th at it d oes n ot f u lly inte r- 
face with TOOLKIT You con not 
use theiNP@' command or the 
TOOLKIT Ed'itorwhilst running 
SCRIBE. This is because the 
screen locations are not 
translated . It should be possible 
for acompetent programmerto 
mod ify t hese problem s t hou g h . 

I hope that this reveiw gets 
published andthat it isof some 
interest. I hold a personal opi- 
nion that Delta DOS users have 
been given a raw deal in the past 
in regards to printed matter and 
hopefully this will redress the 
balance slightly. 

Oh yes, \ nearly forgot... I 
award TOOLKIT five Dragons 
AN D SCR I B E f u r Dragons (on- 
ly 4 because it does not inter- 
face with TOOLKIT). 

D. Martin 



Toolkit: 




?\', mMSL* 



■i m^Ri-. 



Scribe; 




Dragon User October 1987 7 



Auto Boot 

Julian Osbourne outruns the BT Error h Basic or M/C. 



ACCORDING to pages 22 and 27 ot the 
Dragon DOS manual the BOOT com man d 
is provided for loading other operating 
systems from disc' and ft goes on (in no 
great depth) to say that the system is load- 
ed i^nto niemory at address 0720 (decimal) 
and executed from address 9730 
(decimal). Great. So what actually hap- 
pens when you type BOOT with a normal 
disc in the drive?? Answer : a BT Error 
(code 142), 

Nothing about the BOOT command (or 
the BT error) is covered in any detail in any 
of the general reference books such 3.5 in- 
side the Dragon or Anatomy ofti^e Dragon, 
in fact the only time BOOT rs mentioned is 
to say that its BASIC token is $D1 and the 
BOOT despatch address is at $DADC 
wh ich , if you are anythi ng like rne, means 
nothing at allf 

The object of thjsarticle isio show how to 
use the BOOT command on you r own discs 
to simplify the running of your most often 
used programs, so here goes-. 

When It Is called the BOOT routine in 
Dragon DOS reads sector 3 of track on 
the current drive (address SEB, default = 
drive 1). If the first two bytes of this sector 
are the ascii codes for OS ($4F and $53 
respectively) then 4K of code is loaded 
from disc into address 9728 (decimal) star- 
ting with sector 3 of track 0. When this code 
has been loaded it is executed from ad- 
dress 9730 (decimal). 

The program given in this article uses 
the BOOT routine to implement an auto- 
run facility for a given program 
(MENU. BAS in this example) so that on typ- 
ing BOOT the named program is loaded 
and run with no further action needed. 

The assembly listing is in three distinct 
pieces: 

1) The ascii codes for OS at placed at 
S2600 (9728 decimal) 

2) The code to run 'MENU. BAS' when 
executed 

3) The routine to save the above code to 
sectors, traGl< (My thanks to Brian Cadge 
for supplying the code for pad 2 In his 
Dragon Answers column for August 1985). 

The 'save to disc' part of the routine works 
as follows: 

To save a sector (256 bytes long} to disc, 
location 235 (decimal) is set to the drive 
number locations 236 and 237 (decimal) are 
set to the track and sector where the data is 
to be saved to and locations 238 and 239 
(decimal) are set to the address in memory 
where data is to be saved from. The disc 
write routine at 49409 (decimal) is then 
called to save a sector at a time until the 
end of track (which is approximately 4k of 
code) when the routine returns to BASIC. 

On entering this program (by assembler 
or by machine code loader) save it to disc 
with: 



SAVE"BOOT.BlN",&H2600,&H2637,aH2 

615 

Now insert a blank disc into the drive and 
run the routine with 

EXEC &H2615 

The routine will then save the auto-run part 
of the program to disc (eg from address 
9723 onwards) at track 0, sector 3 and 
return to BASIC, Now save onto this disc 
the program that you require the BOOT to 
operate on (eg the program MENU. BAS in 



this example) and then type BOOT. The 
program will then toad and auto-run itself, 

The routine given will auto-run BASIC or 
machine code programs by just changing 
th e f i le nam egivenintheFCC st atem en t so 
you coul^d use it to load Moon Cresta or 
Bean$tatkeri[ist aseasityas using it to run 
a menu program for your utilities disc, 

I am willing to attempt to answer any 
q ue r ies reg ard i n g th e us e of the BOOT p ro- 
gram that may arise during its use. My ad- 
dress is B Helston .Road, Nailsea, Bristol, 
BS19 2UA, or messages can be left in my 
Prestel r/lailbox 272853331. 



OPG 9728 
START FCC /OS/ BOOT FLAG 

#THE PROGRAM BELOW WILL BE RUN * 
^WHENEVER BOOT IS TYPED * 



FNAME 



LDX 
SIX 
JMP 
FCC 



£FNAME 

166 

$II4A4 

34, /MENU- BAS/, 34,0 

»THE NEXT PART CF THE PROGRAM * 
♦SAVES THE ABOVE BOOT PROGRAM # 
*T0 DISK AT TRACK 0, SECTOR 3 * 

eSTART CLRA 

236 

£3 

237 

£9728 

X 

233 

49409 

X 

237 



SAVE 



CLR 

LUA 

STA 

LDX 

PSH3 

STK 

J3R 

FULS 

LEAX 

INC 

LDA 

CMP A 

BLO 

J MP 



TRACK £ 

SECTOR £ 
START ADRS 

BUFFER ADR 
WRITE DISK 



237 
ti9 
SAVE 
33649 



GOTO BASIC 



2600 2600 

2600 4F53 

2602 

2602 

2602 

2602 

2602 SE260A 

2605 9FA6 

2607 7Eri4A4 

260A 224D454e55 FNAME 

2615 

2615 



ORG 9723 
START FCC /OS/ BOOT FLAG 

*THE PROGRAM BELOW WILL BE RUM * 
-^WHENEVER BOOT IS TYPED # 



LDX £FNAME 

STX 166 - 

JMP *D4A4 

FCC 34,/MEMU,BAS/,34,0 

*THE NEXT PART OF THE PROGRAM * 



e Dragon User October 1987 



2615 

2615 

2615 

2615 

2616 

2618 

261A 

261C 

261F 

2621 

2623 

2626 

2628 

262C 

262E 

2630 

2632 

2634 

2637 

2637 



4F 

OFEC 

8603 

97ED 

8E2600 

3410 

9FEE 

BDClOl 

3510 

30890100 

OCED 

96ED 

8113 

25EB 

7E8371 



*SAVES THE 
#T0 DISK AT 

eSTART CLRA 
CLR 
LDA 
STA 
LDX 

SAVE PSHS 
SIX 
JSR 
PULS 
LEAX 
INC 
LDA 
CMP A 
BLD 
J MP 



ABOVE BOOT PROGRAH * 
TRACK 0, SECTOR 3 * 



236 

£3 

237 

£9728 

X 

238 

49409 

X . 

256 »X 

237 

237 

£19 

SAVE 

33649 



TRACK £ 

SECTOR £ 
START ADRS 

BUFFER ADR 
WRITE DISK 



GOTO BASIC 



E 
E 



>D $2600,*2637 
2600 4F S3 8E 26 
2604 OA 9F A6 7E 
2608 D4 A4 22 4D 
260C 45 4E 55 2E 
2610 42 41 53 22 
2614 00 4F OF EC 
2618 86 03 97 ED 
261C 8E 26 00 34 
2620 iO 9F £E BD 
2624 CI 01 35 10 
2623 30 89 01 00 
262C OC ED 96 ED 
2630 81 13 25 SB 
2634 7E 83 71 39 






N 
A 


A 



u 
s 



q 9 



U *26O0,*2637 

2600 4F 

2601 53 

2602 8E260A 
2605 9FA6 
2607 7ED4A4 



CLRA 

COMB 

LDX £*260A 

STX <*A6 

JNP tD4A4 



260A 

260C 

260D 

260E 

260F 

2611 

2612 

2613 

2615 

2616 

2618 

261A 

261C 

261F 

2621 

2623 

2626 

2628 

262C 

262E 

2630 

2632 

2634 

2^37 

>0 



224D 

45 

4£ 

5S 

2E42 

41 

53 

2200 

4F 

OFEC 

3603 

97ED 

8E2600 

3410 

9FEE 

BDClOl 

3510 

30890100 

OCED 

96ED 

8113 

25EB 

7E8371 

39 



BHI 



BGT 

COMB 

EHI 

CLRA 

CLR 

LDA 

STA 

LDX 

PSHS 

STX 

JSR 

PULS 

LEAX 

IWC 

LDA 

CMPA 

ICS 

JMP 

RTS 



*2659 



$2653 



E 
U 

U 



*2615 

<*EC 

£*03 

<*ED 

£*2600 

X 

<*£E 

*C101 

X 

*0100,X 

<tED 

<*ED 

£*13 

*261F 

*S371 



10 As^iLH2600 

20 READ A* 

30 IF A*="##" THEN END 

40 POKE A^VALi "fcH-'+A*) 

50 A=A+1 : GOTO 20 

60 DATA 4F,53,BE,26,0A,9F,A6,7E,D4,A4,22,4D 

70 DATA 45, 4E, 55, 2E, 42, 41, 53, 22, 00, 4F, OF, EC 

30 DATA 86,03,97,ED,SE,26,00,34,10,9F,£E,BD 

90 DATA Cl,01»35, 10, 30, 89, 01, 00, OC, ED, 96, ED 

100 DATA 81, 13, 25, EB,7E, 83,71,39,** 



October 1987 Dragon Users 



IWo extra commands 

R. G. Whittaker inverts his text and scrolls it to the right 



THIS article shows one of many ways to 
add new commands lo Dragon Basic, ll 
uses the faci that each time the Dragon 
reads a statement, it jumps to location 377 
N rm a 1 1 V th is contai ns cod e 57 which i s an 
FfTS instruction, and so the processor 
ret u r n s to w h e re 1 1 was, b u t i f we store code 
126 (JMP instruction) in this location and 
then load location 373 with the address of a 
new routine we can cause the processor to 
access our routine every time it reads a 
statements 

Using this we can write a routine to 
ch eck i f u r n e w com m an d has been typed 
in and then execute a new routine to per- 
form this command's function. This could 
be a routine to, for example, scroll the 
screen or execute an autorepeat function. 
The two commands I ha^/e added are REV. 



which inverts the text screen, and SCR, 
which scrolls the text screen to the right 
one character space. 

First of all tJie program stores code 126 
in location 377 and the start address 
of the program in 378. Then it returns 
to basic. When the routine STAITT is 
executed, it checks the 'A' register to see if 
it IS within the required range 65 ('A^ to 
90 i'Z). Then it checks if this is the first 
letter of the new command ('R') and if not it 
jumps to another routine to check for the 
second command, otherwise it checks 
the rest of the letters in the command 
using the locations pointed to by location 
166 which hold the rest of the letters in 
statement. 

If the command is correct, the routine 
checks the next character to see if this is 



valid. Usually Ihe only characters one has 
after commands are colons or spaces 
(except f r i n p u t , pa i nt etc) an d so these are 
checked for. If the character is an equate 
sign, the processor would return to basic 
and allow you to use REV or SCR as a 
variable (IE SCR = 10) and so if an equals 
sign or any other character is found, the 
routine loads the 3' register with 2 and 
jumps to the ROM routine at 33604 which 
gives a syntax error 

To enter the new commands, type in the 
loader and enter the codes line by line 
when asked then save the routine as 
instructed. Alternatively, type in the 
assembly listing. The routines are easy to 
change and so you should be able to add 
different commands to your Dragon 
Basic. 



Listing 1 




32070 


06e025F?eiSt39S i 5327 


— 320Q0 


SE7D0C:BFei 7A8t7EB701 


320 S0 


037E7D4C-?Eft6E40 1 Ci 43 


52910 


7939&i5A223CS141253S 


32090 


27037E7D4CE602C: i 5227 


32020 


S 1 5227037E7D4D9E A6E t 


32100 


037E7D4CE603C 1 3A2707 


32!?-30 


01C:i4527(?37E7D4r:E>^.02 


32110 


0121 25037E7D9 1 8E0600 


*:t34S 


CI 5&27037E7D4CE6iZr3C ! 


32120 


Ei-S23404Ci ! FAc^2A7-9 1 


32050 


3A2707C1 2 1 25037E7D9 1 


32130 


5A2£.F93504E7S48C:0400 


320t0 


SE0400A6e4SS40A7S0eC 


32140 


22EA86&639Ci.02BPe344 



Listing 2 


!0 

20 


CLS 

CLEAR200. 31999: AD=32000: CS=0 




30 


PRINT" ENTER LINE OF HEX f*KX' TO EMD) " 




40 


PR I NT AD J iINPUTH* 




50 


FORK^ 1 TuLEN (H* ) STEP2 




60 


M*^MID*<H*^K.2> : IFnf =^" XX "THENI00 




70 


V=^/AL < '^E^H "+M1!; ) : POKE AD, V : CS=CS+V 




30 


AD=ftD+l : NEXTK 




90 


&OTO40 




100 CLS 




110 IFCS<>1455STHENPRINT"DHTfl ERROR TRY AGAIN" ^EMD 




1^0 PRINTe224," PRESS ANY KEYTG SAVE CODE i-" 




130 A*=1NKEV*: IFfi*=""THEH130 




140 CSAVEM" COMMANDS " . 32000 . 32 1 50. 32000 



Listing 3 ^ ,:. 


71^3 


BF 


01 7A 


STX 37S 


J RtJN 


7m6 


36 


7F 


1.DA t.;.26 


LZiG00 ORG $7000 


7D\m 


B7 


0:!, 79 


STA ::577 


7D00 BE 7D 0C UMIT LDX #START 


7l.\m"i 


39 




RTS 



10 Dragon User October 1987 



' -i-i- ni ■ -Hi- ■_•■ J. ■_'■!■ 



■" " ■»..■?.... .i,-.r,.. 



70 .rl?* 81 '-11 

70 i 2 25 38 

7D.16 27 03 

7'D:!.3 7E 7i;i 4l! 

7D.t.B 9t" A6 

•'7rrfi:::- r-l ,l!:": 



02::^ 7E 7D 4i: 



'1(2 to £A 02 



7D28 CI ^56 



7D2A 27 03 



7D2C 7E!- 7B %C 



^:^F E6 c 



3i C::!. 3^i 



7.d::53 2':.' my 



703:5 CI. 21 



'7D:I?7 2"^ Q}3 



■n3i:rj 7p -?j-( c/, 



BHi: END 
CHPPi #65 
BLO END 
rjMF'A #82 
EtFQ PAS!-]; 

■JM!-' si::f;: 

F-'ASS LDX 166 
LDB l.X 
CMF'B ^s|^c.9 
BEO PASS! 

PASSl LDB 2rX 
CilPB #S6 



F'AS:S2 LDB 3^ X 

BEQ COn^i 
CMPB #33 
BLO COMM 



7.05:!. 7E 7B 4C vj/l-iF^' El-ID 



7Tr3C- '^E 04 fZ<0 !::Ci!^tM L.DX :^-1.02'4 



:^D3r f-^-: 84 

7D41. 3S 'j.ia 

7 04 3 A7 80 

7 04 5 SC \d6 i?i(3 

■70''!-B 25 F"!? 

704 A 36 S::^. 
704C. 39 

7D4D Si '!^3 

7rr4r::' :;::'7- i;?i3 



LDPP LDA , >: 

EDRA #*40 

ST A ■, K + 
CHPX **:i536 

BLO LOOP 

LDA #.1.34 

END RT3 

SC-f^ C!'-1PA #::^3 
BEQ SCRl 



7D^:;4 9E: A^:, 
7D56 E6 a. I, 
7D58 r: ? 43 
70!5A 27 iS3 
705C 7F: 7lJ 4C: 
7D5F ■ E:6 !Z«2 
706 1 CI 52 
7063 27 ■2!3 
7DA5 7E 70 4C 
7063 E^6 il.\3 
7r[.:^.A CI 3A 
706C 27 07 
7D6.E C:i 21 
7D-7J^ 23 L?33 
7D72 7p JU 91 



SCRl LOX 166 
LOB 1 , X 
Ct'lPB #67 
BEQ SC:R2 
JNP END 

SCR2 LOB 2^X 

cr\PB #c<^; 

BEO SCR3 
JHF"' Eh«:i 
SCR3 LDB 3. X 
CHF'B i+5S: 
BEO CGNM2 
CMPB #33 
BLD C0MI12 
JMP ERR 



7D75 3E 06 00 C:GMH2 LOX #1536 



:'D78 E^:. 02 
7D7A 34 04 
707C C6 IF 
7D7E h6 82 
7D30 h7 t:rl 

7De;!; 5A '"■ 
7033 26 F9 
7Drd:^v 33 (^4 

70e7 E7 S4 

7089 eC m 01^ 

7DeC 22 EA 
7DS!:E -36 &6 

7090 39 



L0OP2 LOB .-X 

PSHS B 

LDB #3! 
L0OP3 LDA ;=-X 

ST' A 1 :> X 

DECB 

BNE LC[np3 

PULS B 

STB ;. >: 
CMPX #.ti324 

BH X L.0DP2 

LDA #,134 
' r:- T '•"■ 



7D91 C6 '32 ERR LDB #2 
7D93 ED 33 44 J3R 33604 



October 19B7 Dragon User 11 



Scopy for SuperDos 

Martyn Armitage remembers his youth 
and the horrors of swapping discs around. 



RECENTLY a member of our Dragon Club 

upgraded his Cumana Dos V.2.0 to 
Grosvenor SuperDos. One of his regrets 
was the loss of the SCOPY command that 

the Cumana Dos provides. 

He asked if it was possible for me to write 
a utility that would replace this lost piece of 
soft/firmware, and so being the knight in 
shining arrnour that I am, and always wiil- 
ing to accept a challenge, I took up the 
gauntlet. The result of my efforts foHow. 

The function of the SCOPY command, 
for those who are strangers to the Cumana 
Dos, is to enable the user to copy a file from 
one disc to another, using one disc drive. 
How I shudder when thinking back to my 
^one drive' days and the pain and effort in- 
volved in copying files from disc to disc, 
especFally with .DATA files. The program 
that follows wifS remove all the frustrations 
of the one drive owner (well, perhaps I ex- 
aggerate, one of them) 

Listing 1 (the assembler source code) 
was written using the DSKDREAI^ 
package from Grosvenor. Owners of other 
assemblers should have very little or no d!i^ 
ficulty^ in converting it to their own 
assembler format. For those of you without 
an assembler the BASIC program in 
listing 2 wilt instali the machine code 
ready for saving the disc. In both cases the 
resultant code will only run on the 
Eurohard and SuperDos DOSs. If you want 
to run the program on the original Dragon 
Dos V,1.0 then, in the assembler source 
code don't include the V40x equates and 
replace all the references to them wfth the 
VlOx version, ie, for V402 use V102. etc If 
you are assembling other than for the V.I 
Dos then the V10x equates can be left out. 

If you are using the basic listing to install 
the code then you will notice that some 
DATA statements, as well as having a 
number, have a second numberfollowing it 
in brackets, iejine 140 has as one of the 
pieces of data: D1(D4). If you are wanting to 
produce the version for Eurohard/Super- 
Dos then use the first number and ignore 
the number in brackets. If you are wanting 
to produce the version for Drag on Dos 1 
then jgnore the first number and use the 
number in brackets. 

To use the program is simplpcity itself. 
Before loading with a CLEAR200, 
&H7ED0. the program can be summoned 
to your aid by the use of the foJIowingi 



EXEC&H7EDl:'fnamel.ext' 
2.ext^ iENTER) 



TO Iname 



Once this is entered a check is made fo see 
if there is sufficient free memory for the 
utility to operate, if there is less than 256 
bytes the command will be aborted with an 
OM error If there is sufficient memory the 



screen will be cleared and the message: 

INSERT SOURCE 
PRESS At^Y KEY 

will be printed. Once these instructions 
have been carried out, the screen will clear 
and the message: 

READING SOURCE 

wiif be displayed. The disc is then checked 
to see if the file exists, if it doesn't then don't 
be too surprised to get a NE error If the file 
does exist then the screen will clear again 
and the next prompt: 

INSERT DESTINATION 
PRESS ANY KEY 

wilf be displayed- After carrying out these 
instructions the screeri will, for an instant, 
while the file is created on the destination 
disc, display the messge: 

WRITfNG DESTINATION 

The screen wilf then cfear again and re- 
display the INSERT SOURCE, PRESS 



ANY KEY message, The program will then 
proceed to read as much of the file into 

memory as will fit. When memory is full, or 
all the file has been read you will be prc^ 
mpted to change the disc, etc. This pro- 
mpting for disc changes will continue until 
the whole file has been transferred . All this 
disc swapping may sound a bind, but you 
will find that, providing there is no program 
in memory (apart from SCOPY) then most 
flies will be copied in two or three disc 
changes. When copying very large files 
the number of disc changes can be reduc- 
ed by ensuring that the oniy program in 
memory isthe SCOPY one, and by issuing 
a PLCLEAR 1 command before use. the 
result being thai as much memory as is 
available will be claimed by the utility: 

When copying a file it is most important 
that the two file names differ in some 
respect, le. PR0G1, PR0G2 and that the 
extensions are Included, if the names are 
identical then the file will not be copied. 
Changing the extension will suffice as the 
required difference. The utility will copy a 
file to the same disc, prompting for disc 
changes, which should be ignored, but us- 
ing if to do so would be a waste of time as 
the COPY command of the Dos will do it 
without the prompts. 



Listing 1. Assembler Source Code 

* Written in Position Independant Code 

* So the resultant code cslyi be easily 

* relocated, 

ORG $7ED1 

PUT $4ED1 

* SCOPY FOR DRAGON/EUROHARD/SUPER DOS * 

* WRITTEN USING DSKDREAM * 

* BY: MARTVN ARMITAGE * 

* 01/08/87 * 

*#*****************:* *:fr**ilf#^5lt**** ********* 



CREATE 


EQU 


scooc 


LENFIL 


EQU 


$COOE 


GLOBAL 


EQU 


$C010 


READFL 


EQU 


$C014 


WRITFL 


EQU 


$C015 


BACKDR 


EQU 


$C024 



rt***************** ************** *j(,#^jt#^^, 

* USE VlOx EQUATES FOR DRAGON DOS 1 * 
*******************#**********^(at^j,^^*;j^^^^ 

VlOl 
V102 
VI 03 
VI 04 
V105 



EQU 


$D6D4 


EQU 


$C69E 


EQU 


$CEAC 


EQU 


SDF54 


EQU 


$DF6 3 



12 Dragon User October 1987 



V106 


EQU 


$DF77 








icieifkiCkie*******ir****i(*1fk*ii:-k4:***-t;it*-k*1:-k*:ic-k± 




* 


USE 


V40x EQUATES FOR 


* 




* 


EUROHARD AND SUPERDOS 


* 




****ic-k***ie**i!**ik*iff!i{*i!ii!*-k*ic**ic***1t****4t** 




1 V^Ol 


EQU 


$D6D1 








V402 


EQU 


$C6C5 








V403 


EQU 


$CED2 








V404 


EQU 


$DF5A 








V405 


EQU 


$DF6D 








V406 


EQU 


$DF86 








**i(:kM***ik'k*'k*1t*it'k*li**'k'k**;>f!i):***1f;-f:'t:')(*fci<'k-k*'k 




7ED1 


9D9F 


SCOPY 


JSR 


<$9F 




7 ED 3 


AD9FC010 




JSR 


(CLOSAL) 


r 


7ED7 


2643 




BNE 


PASERR 




7ED9 


1700BC 




LBSR 


SOURCE 




7EDC 


3279 




LEAS 


-7,S 




7EDE 


1F40 




TFR 


S,D 




7EE0 


830100 




SUED 


tt$0100 




7EE3 


931F 




SUED 


<$1F 




7EE5 


2B04 




BMI 


OMERR 




7EE7 


5F 




CLRB 






7EE8 


4D 


* 


TSTA 






7EE9 


2603 




BNE 


NOERR 




7EEB 


7E8342 


OMERR 


J MP 


58342 




.-, 7EEE 


ED6 2 


NOERR 


STD 


2,S 




7EF0 


BDD6D1 




JSR 


V401 ;** 


VlOl ** 


7EF3 


2627 




BNE 


PASERR 




7EF5 


A7E4 




STA 


,s 




7EF7 


AD9FC00E 




JSR 


(LENFIL) 




7EFB 


2eiF 




BNE 


PASERR 




7EFD 


1700AA 




LBSR 


DESTIN 




7F00 


9DA5 




JSR 


<$A5 




7F02 


81BC 




CMP A 


#$BC J TO 


■? 


i 7F04 


2703 




BEQ 


NOERRl 




7F0e 


7E39B4 




JMP 


$89B4 




7F09 


9D9F 


NOERRl 


JSR 


<$9F 




7F0B 


BDD6D1 




JSR 


V401 ;** 


VlOl ** 


7F0E 


2704 




BEQ 


NOERR 2 




7F10 


ClAO 




CMPB 


#SAO ;NE 


ERROR ? 


7F12 


2608 




BNE 


PASERR 




7F14 


A761 


N0ERR2 


STA 


1,3 




7F16 


AD9FC00C 




JSR 


( CREATE ] 




7F1A 


2703 




BEQ 


MORE 




7F1C 


7EC6C5 


PASERR 


JMP 


V402 ;** 


V102 ** 


7F1F 


AD9FC024 


MORE 


JSR 


(BACKDR] 




7F23 


A6E4 




LDA 


,s 




7F25 


9 7F1 




STA 


<$F1 




7F27 


BDCED2 




JSR 


V403 ;** 


V103 ** 


7F2A 


ECOC 




LDD 


12, X 




7F2C 


10A38eiO 




CMPD 


16, X 




7F30 


2507 




BCS 


NOCHEK 




7F32 


A60E 




LDA 


14, X 




7F34 


Aie812 




CMP A 


18, X 




7F37 


2756 




BEQ 


NOMORE 




7F39 


EEOC 


NOCHEK 


LDU 


12, X 




7F3B 


A6 0E 




LDA 


14,X 




7F3D 


A766 




STA 


6,S 




7F3F 


EF64 




STU 


4,S 




7F41 


EC62 




LDD 


2,S 




7F43 


E3 6 5 




ADD 


5,S 




7F45 


ED65 




STD 


5,S 





October 1937 Dragon User 13 



7F47 


2402 




BCC 


NOINC 




7F49 


6C6 4 




INC 


4,S 




7F4B 


A66 4 


NOINC 


LDA 


4,S 




7F4D 


A0e810 




SUBA 


16, X 




7F50 


250E 




BCS 


HEREl 




7F52 


EC6 5 




LDD 


5,S 




7F54 


A3e811 




SUED 


17, X 




7F57 


2307 




BLS 


HEREl 




7F59 


EC8811 




LDD 


17, X 




7F5C 


A3 0D 




SUBD 


13, X 




7F5E 


ED 6 2 




STD 


2,S 




7F60 


8D36 


HEREl 


BSR 


SOURCE 




1 7F62 


A6E4 




LDA 


,s 




7F64 


EEOC 




LDU 


12, X 




7F66 


E60E 




LOB 


14, X 




7F66 


10AE62 




LDY 


2,S 




7F6B 


9E1F 




LDX 


<$1F 




7F&D 


AD9FC014 




JSR 


(READFL) 




7F71 


26A9 




BNE 


PAS ERR 




7F73 


8D35 




BSR 


DESTIN 




7F75 


A661 


1 ' 


LDA 


1,S 




7F7 7 


97F1 




STA 


<$F1 




7F79 


BDCED2 


* 


JSR 


V403 ;** V103 ** 




7F7C 


lOAEeSlO 




LDY 


16, X 




7F80 


E68812 




LDB 


18, X 




7F8 3 


EE62 




LDU 


2,S 




7F85 


9E1F 




LDX 


<$1F 




7F87 


AD9FC016 




JSR 


(WRITFL) 




7F8B 


268F 




BNE 


PASERR 




7F8D 


2090 




BRA 


MORE 




7F8F 


AD9FC010 


NOMORE 


JSR 


ICLOSAL) 




7F93 


2687 




BNE 


PASERR 




7F9& 


3267 




LEAS 


7,S 




7Fg7 


39 




RTS 






7F9 8 


3476 


SOURCE 


PSHS 


D,x,y,u 




7F9A 


BDBA7? 




JSR 


SBA7 7 




7F9D 


8EDF5A 




LDX 


#V404 ;** V104 ** 




7FA0 


BD9 0E5 




JSR 


S90E5 




7FA3 


8D1A 




BSR 


KEY 




7FA5 


308C23 




LEAX 


READ-1,FCR 




7FA& 


2010 




BRA 


RETURN 




7FAA 


3476 


DESTIN 


PSHS 


D,X/Y,U 




7FAC 


BDBA77 




JSR 


$BA7 7 




7FAF 


8EDF60 




LDX 


ttV405 ;** V105 ** 




7FB2 


BD90E5 




JSR 


$90E5 




7FB5 


8 DO 8 




BSR 


KEY 




7FB7 


308C20 




LEAX 


WRITE-1,PCR 




7FBA 


BD90E5 


RETURN 


JSR 


$90E5 




7FBD 


35F6 




PULS 


D,X,Y,U,PC 




7FBF 


SEDFeS 


KEY 


LDX 


ftV406 ;** V106 ** 




7FC2 


BD90E5 




JSR 


$90E5 




7FG5 


BDB505 




JSR 


$b505 




7Fce 


BDBA77 




JSR 


SBA7 7 




7FCB 


39 




RTS 






7 FCC 


52454144 


READ 


FCC 


/READ/ 




7FD0 


494E4720 




FCC 


/tNG / 




7FD4 


534F5552 




FCC 


/SOUR/ 




7FD8 


434500 




FCC 


/CE/,0 


__ 


7FDB 


57524954 


WRITE 


FCC 


/WRIT/ 




7FDF 


494E4720 




FCC 


/ING / 




7FE3 


44455364 




FCC 


/DEST/ 




7FE7 


494E4154 


■ 


FCC 


/I NAT/ 





14 Dragon User October 1987 















7FEB 494F4E00 FCC /ION/,0 








;WHEN THE PROGRAM HAS BEEN ASSEMBLED SAVE IT TO 








;DISK WITH SAVE"SCOPY" , &H4ED1 , &H4FEF, &H4ED1 THEN 








; ENTER CLEAR200,&H7ED0:LOAD"SCOPY.BIN",&H7EDl 








;ONCE LOADED RESAVE TO DISK WITH 








; SAVE"SCOPY" , &H7ED1, &H7FEF, &H7ED1 








;THE PROGRAM CAN THEN SUBSEQUENTLY BE RELOADED 








; WITHOUT HAVING TO USE AN OFFSET TO RELOCATE IT, 








REM *USERS OF DRAGON DOS V.l. USE THE 








1 REM ^NUMBERS IN BRACKETS INSTEAD OF THE 








2 REM *NUMBER IMMEDIATELY BEFORE IT 








3 REM *IE,.. DATA 4E(42) USE 4 2 INTEAD OF 4E 








4 REM *USERS OF OTHER DOS ' S IGNORE THE NUMBERS 








5 REM *IN BRACKETS. , , 








6 REM *************************************** 








7 REM * SCOPY FOR DRAGON/EUROHARD/SUPER/DOS * 








8 REM * BY MARTYN ARMITAGE 01/08/1967 * 








9 REM *************************************** 








10 CLEAR 200,&H7EDO:CLS:PRINT"INSTALLING SCOPY" 








20 FOR I = &H7ED1 TO iH7FEF 








3 READ A$:A-VAL("SH"+A$) 








40 POKE I,A:CS=CS+A 








50 NEXT 






— 


60 IF CS 032404(32264) THEN PRINT "ERROR IN DATA" : END 






70 CLS;PRINT"SCOPY I NSTALLED . " :PRINT"START ADDRESS 


fiH7EDl" 






80 PRINT" END ADDRESS &H7FEF" 








90 PRINT" EXEC ADDRESS &H7ED1" 








100 PRINT"REMEMBER TO SAVE ITl";END 








110 DATA 9D,9F,AD,9F,CO,10,26,43,i7,00 








120 DATA BC, 32, 79, IF, 40, 33, 01, 00, 93, IF 








130 DATA 2B,04, 5F,4D,26,03,7E,83,42,ED 








140 DATA 62, BD,D6,D1(D4) ,26,27, A7,E4 
150 DATA AD,9F,CO,OE,26,1F,17,00,AA,9D 
160 DATA A5,ei,BC, 27,03,7E,89,B4,9D,9F 
170 DATA BD,D5,D1{D4),27,04,C1,A0, 26 
180 DATA 08,A7,61, AD,9F,C0,0C,27,03,7E 
190 DATA C6,C5(9E},AD,9F,C0,24,A6,E4 
200 DATA 97,F1,BD,CE,D2(AC),EC,0C,10 
210 DATA A3,e8,10,25,07,A6,0E,Al,88,12 
220 DATA 27,56,EE,0C,A6,0E,A7,66,EF,64 
230 DATA EC,62,E3, 65,ED,65,24,02,6C,64 
240 DATA A6,64,A0, 8e,10,25,0E,EC,65,A3 
250 DATA 88,11, 23, 07, EC, 88, 11, A3, OD, ED 
260 DATA 62,aD,36,A6,E4,EE,0C,E6,0E,10 
270 DATA AE,62,9E,1F,AD,9F,C0,14,26,A9 
280 DATA eD,35,A6,6l,97,Fl,BD,CE,D2(AC) 
290 DATA 10,AE,88,10,E6,88,12,EE,62,9E 
300 DATA IF, AD, 9F, CO, 16, 26, 8F, 20, 9 0, AD 
310 DATA 9F,CO,iO, 26, 87, 32,67,39,34,76 
320 DATA BD,BA,77,8E,DF,5A(54),BD,90 
330 DATA E5,eD,lA, 30, SC, 23, 20,10,34, 76 
340 DATA BD,BA,77,eE,DF,6D(63),BD,90 
350 DATA E5,8O,08,30,&C,20,BD,90,E5,35 
360 DATA F6,8E,DF, 86(77), BD, 90, E5,BD 
370 DATA B5,05,BD,BA,77,39,52,45,41,44 
380 DATA 49,4E,47,20,53,4F,55,52,43,45 
390 DATA 00,57,52, 49, 54, 49, 4E, 47,20,44 
400 DATA 45,53,54,49,4E,41,54,49,4F, 4E 
410 DATA 00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00 




^ 









October 1987 Dragon User 15 



Down in the dumps 

Dragon User frequently gets requests for screen dumps. Here we present some 

specimens from our colfectfon 



IN previous \ss\jesoi Dragon U^er routines 
have been given for graphics dumps fo a 
variety of printers. One type that has been 
omitted is a Tandy dot matrix printer. The 
programs described in this article have 
been designed for and used on a Tandy 
DMP 110 printer which is capable of 
operating in a 16-dot addressable high 
resolution graphics mode. The small size 
dump {listing 1) is compatible with all 
2-colour graphics modes on the Dragon 
and gives a printout with the correct orien- 
tation. Because of size limitations a dump 
of double size needs to be done sideways. 
Listing 2 gives a program which will 
Operate in PM0DE4.1 only. Both programs 
are written in position independent code 
and can be located anywhere in memory. 
In use both programs require the 
pmode, foreground and background col- 
ours to be set. Once this information is 
available a dump is performed with thecu r- 
rent foreground colour as black. Afull list of 
both Dragon and printer codes used by the 
programs Is given in table 1. Output to the 



printer is by a JSfl instruction to the ROM 
location &H 800F with the code to be out- 
put in the W register. 

The mode of information storage used 
by the Dragon in its graphics screen 
me mo ry req u i res s pec i at tech n i q u e s to b e 
adopted if dumps are to be performed in 
the correct orientation. This is achieved in 
listing 1 by the use of a butter store. Prior to 
the testing of the screen memory the par- 
ticular PMODE in use is examined and 
tested for validity. !f an invalid PMODE (1 or 
3) i s i: n use no pri nter o utpu t is made an d an 
immediate return is made to the calling 
program. Once the PMODE in use has 
been determined appropriate pin firing 
patterns are stored in the locations PPATi 
to PPAT4. The screen start location and the 
number of bytes in each row are then deter- 
mined. Once these parameters have been 
set up the screen memory is scanned row 
by row and appropriate pin firing patters for 
each bit loaded into the buffer. When four 
rows (two for PMODE 0) have been ex- 
amined the printer is initialised and the 



contents of the store output to the printer. 

The double size dump (fisting 2) 
presents an alternative approach to the 
problem of unravelling screen memory In 
this case the screen memory is examined 
column by column. The contents of each 
byte are manipulated between the W, 'B' 
registers and a temporary store prior to be- 
ing out put to the printer; in this mode each 
column is examined twice. 

The approaches to screen dumping 
outlined in this article can be extended to 
give either a double density dump, a dou- 
ble size horizanta! partial dump or a smyJI 
sideways dump. Listings 1 and 2 have 
been produced using Dskdream although 
the hex codes given in column 2 could 
always be entered using one of the many 
Hex Loaders that have appeared in these 
pages. Assumi ng that one of the programs 
has been loaded at ihe default location of 
SiH 7C00 (the memory requirement is &H 
400 bytes) it can be called by EXEC &H 
7C0a 

Richard Hatton 



©00r Output cf c<Kie to primer 

B2 Foref roLnjr colour 

B6 PMOOF 

B9 Numbflf of Bvtes in row 

S7 BoTTom of praohic* 5^r#»n 

BA Top of BFflphicfi screen 

PHnter Piremfft^rs 



16 47 
le ie,x.K 

lA 
IE 



3^? 5 
3001 

3«13 
3017 
??t? 

3^23 

30BF 

3&3J 

3^3& 
3635 



&/120 Una f«d 
position print Nead 
eend high r^pluUon gridhics dAta 
carrsapp raturnmo Wrm -f^ed 

* LIFTING I 

t 

* COP VR] GMT J.R.HATTDfJ 

* SEPTEMBER lee^ 
OUTCHR EQU ite^^F 

PSN3 

CWPE 
PEP 



9i3€ 
D&B = 
Ciflip 

27^B 
3««& 

ceip 

E78DWB1 
9EeA 

E&9Mlft3 
C17E 
P6^1 
3? 

3ieDei9A 

BD7t 
17^1^fi 

9:e7 

SGEC 

&&lt 



PLK 



?T 



CONT 



LDP 
5TE 

BPA 
LDB 
STB 



ST 
COL.PCR 

«eA 

PWOPE 



LOB EROR.PCR 

CWP0 **76 

PHE COWT 
RT5 

PSR CLE^R 

LEAV 3TDRE.PCR 

5TV 5T0ST.PCR 

eSP I5ET5D 

Le?R PRI^T 

CMPM *B^ 

iNE CDf^T 

LOA if IE 



3^3 A EDBWf 
303Q d^3b 
3^"^f 39 

3Wfl A7eD017d 
B^^? A7SD^t7* 
3eiC CiW 

305« e69A 
30^5 ATSD^IBS 
3^?f=i Bf^AC^ 

305C 33 

305D B^0^ P*^? 

3?^F A7BD^3 5P 

3eS.5 A7BDfl5A 

JfN^q PP0P 

3e6F ee2^ 

3S71 A7eDi3l4B 

3^75 eBB& 

3^77 ATBD^Ue 

3^76 CIW 

3^7D E^^i 

397P 39 

3W(J CtW PMiJ 

5^34 3i 

3$B1 9&7S ERA 

3M7 A73D&137 

S§SB 33 

3§9C 9l.SD^^gi CLEAR 

3i9fi ilf 
3^97 5F 

?e98 gDAl CL 

309 A l^ACEl 

3090 MF3 

3^9 F 33S5 

3^ A I 33 

3-^A2 E=.gQ0| [6 GETEQ 

39 A6 E7gC0l0B 

30 A A 3130^114 PASS 

3^AE 3 0AF3C'0t07 

3^63 E 6800 106 

IvEl E7gCjfl@F9 

309e 0609 RDW 

:i^ai] E7gD3'3F.S 

30C1 13AE3O00fa 

30C6 A&B& BYTE 



JSR 


C'lJTCHl? 


PULS 


>f.X.A.B 


BTS 




LPF 


«9e 


LOA 


*? 


STA 


PASND, PCR 


STft 


PnHiND.PCR 


CWP0 


*eP 


&riE 


PME 


LOA 


tie 


STA 


PPATl , PCR 


LDA 


•*)se 


ST^ 


PPATHrPCR 


RT5 




LPA 


It? 


ETA 


PPATJ.PCT* 


LDA 


#il 


PTA 


l?nwNa,PC«? 


LDA 


fB 


ETA 


PPATe.PCR 


LDA 


«3? 


STA 


PP AT 3, PCR 


LDA 


iipa 


STA 


PPAT4, PCR 


CWPB 


*s 


PNE 


PH4 


RTS 




Of PS 


HJ 


ONE 


ERR 


HTS 




LDA 


#f7g 


STA 


EROR.PCR 


HT3 




lEAV 


5TDEN0,PCR 


P3HS 


V 


LEAV 


STORE, PCR 


CLSA 




CLRB 




STCJ 


.V++ 


CMPY 


.3 


QNE 


CL 


LEAS 


2.9 


RT3 




l.UB 


PASNO.PCH 


STa 


PASCNT.PCR 


LEAY 


PPATI, PCR 


STY 


PATMO, PCR 


LD9 


ROWNO.PCH 


^Tfl 


ROWCNT, PCS 


LDQ 


«g^ 


STB 


SYTCNT.PCR 


LOY 


STOST.PCR 


LDA 


.Kf 



sees 

3yC-3 

3aca 

30 CO 
10Cf 

3aoi 

3@D3 
30Q3 
30Q7 
30D9 
3^DB 
30OD 
3^0 F 
39E] 
30C3 
3^£5 
30E7 
3^Eg 
30ED 
30^1 
30F3 
30f5 
10F9 
30FE 
3100 
31 W 
3103 
3109 
3100 
3111 
Bl\^ 
3H& 

31 ID 
3JE! 
3tP3 
3125 

mm 

31?A 

31?B 
31 SF 
3131 
3133 
= t3ii 
313£ 
3133 

= 13E 
3U& 
3143 
3U^ 
314E 
314A 



356* 

3059 

9340 

aD.55 

S5?0 

SDSt 

8510 

BDJD 

e509 

9049 

3504 

S043 

9502 

9041 

95^1 

9030 

5ii9O0'5CA 

EbeD-^0C5 

Cl0i 

3GD1 

BABD00GO 

10AEBO00BC 

3131 

l^AF80^e93 

E6BD00AQ 

C100 

S6AE 

9ABD00A4 

10AE3D00Aa 

S1&1 

EEBD0^34 
C10^ 

3703 
3i?E 

3^ 

E^3D^03e 

EBA4 

E7A1 

3^ 

Bbl9 

B09eeF- 

EE4"' 

9E19. 
BDBf^F 
BElt 
BOB^?F 

BDB0Br 



BITA 

6Sfl 

aiTA 

B3R 

iTTA 

e3R 

BITA 

etTA 

eiTA 
esR 

3ITA 
SSR 
eiTA 
BSR 

Dec 

LOO 

CMPB 

9NE 

CEC 

LDV 

LEA¥ 

^TY 

LOB 

ChlPB 

BNE 

DEC 

LOV 

LEAV 

ETV 

LOB 

CMPB 

BNE 

RTS 

STOBITBE0 
LEAV 
(?T3 
LOB 
ADOE 
STB 
RTS 

PRIEJT LDA 
J3fi 
l^ 
J SI? 
LOA 
J3R 
LOA 
JSR 
LPA 



SET 



#1 

STCBIT 

Mf40 

3T0BIT 

#f20 

STOBIT 

MI0 

9TQatT 

11*03 

STOSIT 

#f04 

STOaiT 

i«0S 

3TGBIT 

#*0i 

gT09lT 

9¥TCMT,FCR 

BVTCMT,PC« 

N09 

BYtE 

ROWCHT.PCR 

PATND.PCH 

I.Y 

PATNO.PCR ■ 

RO*ChiT,PCR 

t*00 

PASCMT.PCR 

STOST^PCR 

l.V 

StD^T.PCR 

PASCNlrPCi; 

«0e- 

PAS& 

SET 

^PATNO.PCR) 

.Y+ + 

#tlB 

OUTCHR 

*f47 

OUTCHR 

4ftlB 

OUTCHR 

*t1& 

OUTCHR 

oLPTcm 



16 Dragon User October 1367 



1 


3!4D gEE? 


LDi^ 


i*?2l 


3191 gnc 


BSR P^OUT 


31S4 ^g 


CTS 




1UF 5DQ0flF 


JSR 


OUTCHR 


3193 313E 


LEAY -a.V 


3ie5 


PflSCN-T ^MS 


ttl 


3i5a S6ig 


LDA 


HflB 


3165 3013 


SSR PRGUT 


3106 


RCllJCr^T RMS 


]«1 


^154 BQaeflF 


J5P 


OUTCHR 


3137 201^ 


BRA ENDW^ 


31B7 


BVTCMT RMB 


*1 


1157 GSi5 


LOA 


M«49 


5133 CSFF P«4 


LDB ii*FF 


?igg 


STCST RMB 


^2 1 


315? SQa&^F 


J5R 


OUTCHR 


313i E7a€35 


3T9 CHRNO-PCR 


31SA 


PATNO RMB 


nz 


3i5<: a&§& 


LDA 


»tf@2 


11?E SDy^^ -PTi e^f? pl?OUT 


31^C 


PA^NO RMS 


*t 


use BDa^flF 


J5R 


GkiTCMR 


3l?a E&Bcg^ 


LC-e chrnOhPci! 


3190 


RO'i^NO RMB 


Kf 


3161 35M 


LDA 


M«^9 


^193 Ct&a 


CMP0 i-a^ 


3J9E 


PPATI RM-B 


*t 


31E3 BQS^^^ 


JSR 


aiJTCHR 


3193 a6F7 


OME *?PT4 


310F 


PPAT2 R!/B 


*! 


3lbS 3ieC5B 


LEAV 


^TORE.PCfi 


3197 SDftb 


esR p<?oyT 


31C3 


PPAT3 RMB 


«t 


31 B9 ObSe 


LE-e 


%BB 


5199 06 1 A ENDPfi LOa #13 A 


31C1 


PPAT4 PMB 


8ti 


11SB Cl3i 


CMPg 


#4 


=t9B GDSa^F 


JSR a-JTCHH 


ilea 


^ROR R*'e 


41 


31 5D 271 A 


SEQ 


FR4 


31 9E 39 


9T3 


31C3 


CHRI'JO RMS 


#1 


31 if CSFE 


PR^ LD9 


#|FE 


3tgf Aten^ PPOIJT LDA ,V+ 


31 C4 


STO«E RM9 


41 


3ni E7eC4F 


379 


CMPNn.p^P 


31 A i BVm^f 


J^R OUTCHR 


31C5 


BMO 


liSFF 


3174 ao^g 


RPT0 esR 


PRDUf 


31 A4 A6AS 


LCA ,V+ 


3^Cfl 


F?M6 


#*FF 


3n6 11^^ 


lEAY 


-5.Y 


3iAb eoaMf 


rSR O'JTCHR 


33C3 


3TCEIJ0 RMQ 


itl 


3179 aD25 


BSR 


PRDUT 


31A9 96^^ 


LOA Ada 


33Cd 


#1 


317A ESaC4b 


LDQ 


CKRNO.PCR 


3iAe Bm^^f 


J?R ' OUTCHR 


33C5 






31^0 ciee 


CMPB 


Ne^ 


3IAE eDS^^F 


■J3R OUTCHR 








317F 3SF3 


E1!E 


FPTi^ 


3 SB I ^A^r^^F 


DEC CHRhra.PCR 










LISTING 


2 












306] 


*Cr*P'^^I^HT 


I R HATTQN 


3&59 EASOBSgg 


DEC COUNT. PCR 


3flAF 59 


ROLB 




336] 


tMAPC*i 3 9^7 




30SD 26F& 


BNE CO- WB 


3^90 !9 


?OL0 




5^0] ee»^F . 


OUTtHR EQU 


ieS0F 


305F eeiA 


LDA iflJ^ 


309: EEflC42 


AQOe 


TEW. PCI? 


300] 343e 


C'SHS 


V , K . A . B 


30C^ eDe00F 


.3^R OiJ'^CHR 


3064 E7aC40 


^Tfl 


PTeMP.PCR 


3OT3 D€B? 


tOf 


tB7 


3064 aee^l^B] 


LEAX f)©0].X 


JI^BT ?F 


CLPB 




30c*5 ciee 


CW^B 


#00 


3068 BC2d0e 


CMPX #$2400 


3@es 46 


*?QPA 




30E7 2OT* 


ehTE 


BLK 


30t:B 2eei 


BNE ROW 


1099 ^9 


fiPLB 




3&^9 {:e43 


LW 


#*43 


3060 3S36 


PUL3 K.Y,A.e 


T^BA 59 


ROLB 




3&B& E7BC]E 


STP 


IWTA.PCP 


306F 33 


PTf= 


^eSB 59 


l?01_B 




3D0E E7eC4e 


STP 


INVTB^PCl^ 


3070 eeiB mu lda #ti& 


30BC 59 


RDLB 




3eu 2&9e 


BRA 


ST APT 


3072 Boee^^ 


JSE? OUTCHR 


5060 is 


fiGRA 




3019 C&12 


BL « L DB 


itS12 


3075 6647 


LOA iS^47 


30BE 59 


ROLB 




3ets E7ec]4 


StE 


TWTA.PCP 


3077 BDBm^ 


J%9 DUTCHR 


30eF 59 


POL 9 




30 te E7&D36 


STE 


IMVTB.PCF 


307 A 961 B 


LDA ttlE 


30C0 E73C33 


5TB 


TEMP.PCR 


301 B eE23Ee 


ST APT LDV 


*iS23Fe* 


307C BDe00F 


JSP OUTCHR 


30C3 59 


ROLB 




^^301E AFeD00Ol 


RO* STy 


cdlSlt.pcf 


307F B6ie 


LDA #l3e 


30C4 59 


ROLB 




3022 EOAC 


BSF 


INIT 


30S1 SD800F 


JSR OUTDHP 


39CS EBSC2E 


ADDS 


TEMP.PCR 


30^4 cece^ 


LDB 


#tc^ 


30Si Be00 


LDA «jeP 


30CS lESg 


EKG 


A.B 


392e FTsoeace 


S7E 


COUNT. PCif 


30SE. &O800f 


jm OUT CUP 


30CA BD!B00F 


JSR 


OUTCHR 


30 2 A «e^ 


COLMA LDA 


K 


3039 B6€0 


LDA «9E 


30CD A78C26 


STA 


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October 1987 Dragon User 17 



A Composer at Ossett 

George and Jonathan Cartwright start out reminiscing and find themselves 

answering difficult questions 



TELLiNG friends that you are going lo 

spend a day in Os$ett demonstrating a? a 
computer show brings forth aflurry of com- 
ments. "Wh6re?'V'YouVe going to do 
what?'\ "What's a Dragon?" "Why?" and 
so on. The last question is easy to answer. 

Having submitted a high resolution text 
utility last yearto John Pennforevaluation. 
it transpired that the lau nch of our software 
would be at the First John Penn show at 
Ossett. We set to work producing some 
demonstration programs in the hope of 
catching the eye of some other software 
houses. At the lime we had three games 
and Composer Companion in develop- 
ment. The 1986 show gave us the chance 
to talk to people in the business and chat to 
thai band of diehard Dragon users who 
keep the computer alive. 

All the comments (cruel and construc- 
tive) we absorbed in ChaE first show gave us 
the confidence to continue developing, 
resulting in five programs being accepted 
by a software house the following 
December. {Wow you know what ^hows are 
forjQ^ks — Ed) 

This year we were kindly asked to attend 
Ossett again, The biggest job was packi^ng 
all the gear into the car for the journey 
across the Pen nines. However, the effort 
was worth it, and soon we were talking non- 
stop to Dragon fans. Many of the people 
who visited our stand had been at the 1986 
show and they actually remembered us! 
(Greetings to Mr. Hollimanfrom Harrogate, 
and also to Stuart Beard wood and the kids 
from Westgarth Children's Home. Stuart's 
computer work with disabled children 
deserves the support of Dragon fans (see 
DU Oct. '86 and Feb '87). 

An anecdote at this point may give the 
readers some insight into the saying '1t 
takes all sorts to make a computer show". 
The owner of one stand was asked if he 
would Hke to buy a new program. We were 
asked if we would load this game so that an 
on-the-spot assessment could be made. 
This game was a 'shoot em up' type and 
graphically very good. The vendor wanted 
toselt it outright for a LARGE sum of money 
(don't we all?)- In these days of a static 
market, such deals are a thing of the past! 

At the Ouickbeam stand I talked to 
Wayne Smith son and discovered that 
SuperOOS doesn't need to be soldered in- 
to the controllers. Not a lot of Cartwrights 
knew that. I had been apprehensive about 
the juxtaposition of a soldering iron and a 
Dragon for some time. So off I went to Har- 
ris Microsoftware and bought Super DOS 
— a bargain that no disc user should be 
without. 

There were a nu mber of new releases — 
Wayne's Sup&rkid, several from Micro vi- 
sion on both cassette and disc. Crazy 
Foo^e/ from Computape. New releases are 
a sign of support for the Dragon — long 
may that support last. ReaNy heavy users 



were catered for by John Penn with OS-9. 
Compusense and Microvision with FLEX. 
and Harris with BASIC 42. Music was well 
represented with Chris Jolly's DAMS, 
David Makin displaying Musio Ms^ker, and 
us with Composer Companion. 

Talking of Composer Companion, 
something that we were asked more often 
than "Can I have a leaf let?" was "How can 
I transfer Composer from tape to disc?". 
Th e method to t ran sf e r f rom tape to D rag on 
DOS. or compatible, is as follows: 

1.CLOADM Composer into your Dragon 
With DOS detached (use the program in 
March 1985 DU). 

2.Select the option to save a tune to tape 
as M/C (you don't actually have to write a 
tune, if the program finds no tune in 
memory it just saves the Composer codo 
itsetf. Mote down the start, end and exec 
addresses of the program. 

3. Switch off your Dragon then switch it 
on again, no need to detach DOS this time. 

4.CLOADWI the tune you saved to tape. 

5.SAVE it to disc with the start, end and 
exec addresses that you noted down. 

Having done this you can load in Com- 
poser Companion and it will run perfectly. 
Anytime you subsequently wish to use 
Composer Companion simply load up Lhe 
saved tune first. I hope this is of use lo 
people. 

Since several hundred people have 
bought our HIRESTEXT program (still 
available at a knockdown price of £3 from 
John Pen n ) 1 s u ppose I 'd better te 1 1 y o u how 
to convert that from tape to disc. Once 
again this conversion is for Dragon DOS. 

1. Power up your Dragon with DOS 
installed. 

2.PCLEAR6-CLOADM-HES-TEXT" 
1536 

3.Enter the following program and run it: 

^* "RES-TEXT" FOR DRAGON DOS 
CONVERSION PROGRAM^ 

1 '*FIRSTCLOADM"RES-TEXr'.1536 

2 '^THEN RUN THIS PROGAM 

3 "^PLEASE ADD 1536 TO ALL POKES 
REGARDING 'RESTEXT' 

4 ^*I.E. POKE10005 + 1536.255 FOR 
INVERSE 

10 FOR l-&H2C00TD&H2Ce8 

20 RESTORE:PRINTl:A=PEEK(l) 

30IFA = &H1ETHENPOKEL&H24 

40 IF A'256+PEEK(I + 1).&H2C00 THEN 

60 

50 NEXT 

60B-PEEK{M) 

70 READ PS!lFP$ = "^" THEN NEXTGOT 

O110 

80 IFB-VALr&H"+PS) THEN N90 ELSE 

70 



90A-A+6POKELA:NEXT 
100 DAM B7;iO,BFCaFD.FC.BE.F7.F6, 
B6' 

110 PCLEAR6:DEFUSR0=972e+1536 
120 PM0DE4.1:SCREEN1.1:PCLS 
130 X=0:Y-0:A$="DRAGONDOS CON- 
VERSION PROGRAM":GOSUB150 
140SCREEN11:GOT0140 
150 POKE10012 + 1536Y:POKE10013 + 
1536. X:Z = USRO(VARPTRfAS)}:Y^PEEK 
(1D012+1536}:X = PEEK(10013+1536): 
RETURN 

4.SAVE the newly converted program to 
disc using: 

SAVE'^RESTEXT BIN" 7680+ 1536.10015 
+ 1536.41194 

5-From now on all pokes regarding the 
program are as follows: 

POKE 10013 + 1536. X co-ord of text 
POKE 10012 + 1536. Yco^ord of text 
POKE 10005+1536. 255 — Inverse lext 
POKE 10005+1536. — Normal text 
DEFUSRO- 9728 + 1536 

e.The designer program on the tape will 
not work with the disc version. Therefore 
you must write your own or design your 
character sets using the tape version of HI 
RESTEXT and Ihen convert them to disc. 

I have also been asked how to convert HI 
RESTEXT to run on lhe 64. Not owning a 64 
I can't test this but here goes ... 

1-Load up the tape version of HI 
RESTEXT as normal. 

2„Find out the 64 equivalent of ROM 
routine 58827 f rom= you r local whizz-kid , 

3. POKE this value into locations S2601 
and 32602. The prograrn should then work 
as usual. 

Tandy Co-co owners should be able to 
use the program by poking the Co-co 
equivalent of ROM routine S8B27 into the 
same locations as above. (The designer 
program will have to be converted by a 
Dragon owning friend into Tandy ASCII, 
however.) 

i thir^k we've just about got time for a 
quick plug! Many peopJe sawour unfinish- 
ed gamie Rohbali at Ossett, some even 
thought it was Airbalil Well . it is now finish- 
ed. It is a 3D game with a Marble Madness 
style lar^dscape which covers 49 screens. 
Having attracted the attention of the 
gamers who read this magazine, ail we will 
say now is that it is in the hands of a sofr- 
ware house who are. at this very moment, 
trying to last more than 30 seconds without 
getting kilfedl 

Well, that ^s about it. Who said program- 
mers don't care? What moredo you want — 
blood? (Hoppit Jon — that's editorial 
territory^ 



18 Dragon User October 19B7 



Winners and Losers 



THE insertion of a single word in tine May 
competition would have made all the dif- 
ference! How I wish that I had specified 
sets of common words — or even 
mason ablyoommor} words — or eve n sorts 
of words that the average man in tha streat 
is likely to know if ha hasn't a copy of tha 
OED stuffed up his jumper! 

As it was, all sorts of sequences came 
flooding in, rich with the dredgings from 
numerous dictionaries. Let me confess 
t h at I wou Id h a ve been q u ite ha p py w i t h t h e 
two sets of four words that almost every en- 
trant managed lo find: 

GOD OWL SAP WET 
ADD BEE ILL LOO 

[incidentally, 1oo' is a card game, but the 
more usual meaning is alright by me!) 

I must share ihe sentiment of E.A. 
t^lewman who ends his letter with the 
philosophically optimistic words — 1 look 
forward lo hearing about the sets f have 
misled in due course'. WeH, E.A., some of 
the more bizarre attempts will follow in due 
course, bul firsl, what methods did our 
ccrmpetitors use? 

The minority choice was to use a 
vocabulary of several hundred words 
typed into DATA lines. Each word is taken i n 
turn J he 'offset' of the second and third let- 
ters is calculated, and the remaining list of 
words is scanned for other words having an 
identical offset, The linnitation of this 
method is that it can only be as com- 
prehensive as its list of words, and also, the 
selection of just three-letter words can be 
difficult. A crossword compiler such as 
CasselTs is ideal for this purpose. 

By far the most popular method was to 
generate all possible permutations of 
three-letter sequences. A condition was 
us u all y i ncl ud od to r e j ect al I sets w h i c h d id 
not contain a vowel (or 'Y'). The set was 
displayed and the operator either ac- 
cepted or rejected it. depending on 
whether it was an acceptable word. In the 
event of an acceptance all other three- 
leiier combinations containing at least one 
vowel were displayed. By inspection the 
sets of four {or moret) words were compil- 
ed. A representative example {from Keith 
David) is shown. 

And now for the results {at least the ones 
that we can print!). Taking as reference 
Charrtbars Twentieth Cer}tury Dictionary 
(1972 edition), Vm disallowing ewk, ahm, 
ahu , adc, apl , taf , ar>d ivo — whatever they 
might mean. Nevertheless, the amazing 
erudition of our competitors provided no 
shortage of sets of four words and, amaz- 
ingly, a few five word setsf From Keith 
David comes: 

DANHERIFSROBURE 

ALSITAPAHTELWHO 

CRYETAFUBLAHTIP 

Keith also included five-word sets using 
GJU. HUH, and CEL — sorry f not in 
Chambers'. 







k 






■ 


K4 


^^^■B^^A 




^^B 



Jake Anderson supplied: 
CRY ETA FUB LAH TIP 
CHADI6PUNVATTYR 
ARKDUNJATRIBULE 



Every month, Gordon Lee will 

fook at some prize programming 

points from a previous month's competition 



Of tlie four- word sets there were too many 
10 print, bul here is a bit of modern verse 
compiled from some of them: 

Dan her rob its. ann err ree boo, 

Dom jus pay tec, add bee ill loo, 
Cly fob ire ran, bod erg nap ret, 
Dal hep lil spa, god owl sap wet. 

Bum has lew pia, dso law pea tie, 
Foh irk rat vex. fah mho nip wry, 
Daw lie rok y rn, ids jei nix tod , 
Bop ers nab ref, awl dzo mix sod. 



I don't expect it rmeans much — but it 
sounds good, don't you think? 

{That just about takes f/re biscuit for 
Vogan verse. Gordon. We didn't know you 
had it in you — how abou t taking it back ?! — 
Ed.} 



Keith David *3 Word-Generdt ing Pro^^j^HLim* 

10 CLS 

20 AS = " ABCDEFGH I JKLJiH OPQRSTU VWX Yl" 

30 FOR B=0 TO 25 

40 FOR C=0 TO 25 

50 BS = RlGHT5(AS,26"-^)+LEFT$( AS,B) 

60 CS = RIGHTSUS,26-CJ+LEFT5(AS,C) 

70 FOR X-1 to 26 

eO YS^M1DS(AS,X^1)+MI[>S(BS,X,1J+M1DS(CS^X^1} 

90 FOH N = l TO 3 
100 Z5=HID5(YS,N,1) 

110 IF INSTR( "AEIOUY",Z5)=0 THEN HKXT W EL3£ k*KlNT 
120 NEXT X 

130 IS^INKEYS:IF IS^''" THEN 130 
140 CLS 
150 NEXT C,B 



iS, 



Communication 

Send in your questions, requests, and pleas to Communication, 
Dragon User, 12-13 Little Newport Street, London WC2. 



Problem L I need help i n converting Dragon 
games to disc under SuperDOS. 
Name: K. Hunt 

Address: 11 Demarnliarn Ciose. West 
Bromwioh, W. Midland^: B70 5RJ 



Problem : Has anyone got a Sanyo DR101 

recorder for saie? 

Name: T. Connor 

Addr&ss: 9 Kenvington Drive. St. Paui's 

Cray. Orpington, Kent 



Problemi i have a Logiiec FT-5000 printer 
made by ttie Kanto Denshir Corporation of 
Japan. Un fortunate iy i liave not got a printer 



manual, and I In ave not been able tQ find an 
agent in this country as yet. Has anayone 
heard of them? Has anyone got a manual? 
The pri n te r seem s to r u n on a m i xtu re of E p- 
son. Star and IBM codes. 
Name: George Dawson 
Address: Me and My Girl , iSCarolineCiose, 
Alvaston. Derby DE2 0OX 



■ 



Problem: Doyoy know where f can get any 
informafion of Floating Point Mathematics 
routines for the Dragon or 6809 
microprocessor based systems? 
Name: R. W. Fair 

Address: 10, Wiiford Place, Hartshili, Stoke- 
on-Trent. Staffs 3T4 7LL 



October 1987 Dragon User 19 



Expert's Arcade Arena 



Write to The Expert' at Dragon User 

1 2-1 3 Little Newport St, London WCZH 7PP. 

with alt your arcade tips and hints. 



MANY many mqons ago 
Dragon ownerswere intrqctuced 
to a Mr. Paul Burgin by virtue of 
three programs, titled simply 
'Program A' 'Program 6'. and 
'Program CI Ever since their 
publication in this magazine, 
and in particular wilh reference 
totheiruseinthiscolumn, there 
has been nothing bui letters 
either saying The man's a 
genius' or These things don't 
work!'. 

It has often been observed 
that human beings are quicker 
to criticise than praise and this 



was certainly true where Mr 
Surgin's fans were concern ed- 
it is for this reason that this 
month I turn the matter over to 
t he man h i msel f. or at least to his 
own two 'hacking sheets' J wilr 
trouble you little longer as page 
space is precious when 
duplicatingsomething ascom- 
plex as this and besides, at least 
if I get this over and done with I 
won't have to print these darn 
programs A,B, and C until 
everyone has to renew their 
subscriptions again next year. 
The sheets are well worth 



looking over as they contain at 
least one reference back to this 
column (circles within circles)! 
Theamateurhacker will find the 
Pokes useful especialiy as they 
com e i n the m ai n with a c lear i n- 
struction of how to load the 
game up and then operate the 
Poke. 

These are the best presented 
hacking sheets. I have seen as 
they pack a lot of information in 
to a small space without losing 
clarity. If anyone can do better 
without repeating the methods 
or pokes of these gems, then 



send ^em in. The reward? Erm, 
well 111 think of something 
stupidf And in the meantime 
may I be the first to congratulate 
Paul Burgin on being The first 
winner of the D.E.C. award 
(Dedicated Expert Column)? 

Next month the column 
returns to its normal fab and 
groovy self with nnore pokes, 
maps, and waffle from me. 

Your loving expert. 

{Andprobabfy another hack- 
ing she&t from Paul Burgin, as 
we only have room for one this 
month — Ed.). 



Adventure Contact 



Adventure: Ket Trihgy/fina! 
Mission 

Problem: What are the five 
answers for the Guardians? 
Mame: ft Vaughan 
Address: 189 Port Tennant 
Road. Port Tennant. Swansea, 
SAT 8JU 

Adventure: Tangfewood 
Problem: Cannot gel Foghorn's 
glasses, I have got tl>e Seer^s 
hat. What next? Help! 



Name; Mark Coops 
Address: 16 willows Drive, 
Meirheath. Stoke on Trent. ST3 
7LZ 

Adventure; 1) TangtBWOCd 2) 
Adventure Trilogy 
Problem: 1} How do I get the 
f is h i ng rod off t he stone g n o me? 
2) Wh at do I do rn I he wh ite void? 
Name: Tim Ent whistle 
Address: 8 Snapps Lcose, 
Wroughlon, Swindon SW40RJM 



Adventure: Fishy Business 

Problem: Can't raise portcullis 

or open the black door. I have the 

pearl 

Name: Adrian Webb 

Address: 22 Rai lion Road, Mor- 

ris Green, Liverpool 

Advienture: 1)FishyBusin&^s2) 

Pmani^ 

Pt>Dblem: 1} Getting started 2) 

Help sheet if possible, please 



Name: Joiin Haining 
Address: Ar ran view, Somerset 

Street, Catrine, Ayrshire. 
Scotland KA5 6RF 

Adventure: Juxtaposition 
Problem; How can J gedt the 
Blue Key Card to open the door 
to the ground level? 
Name: Scott Madden 
Address: 336. Cluny Pface, 
Glenrothes, FifeKY7 4QV 



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KJung Fu £5-00 

lemple (X Doom £5.D0 

Boulder Crash es.M 

Cogmic Crusader £3.99 

Olympia £3.99 

*^fflt5K3 Mansion £3.99 

Fingers, £3.99 

^\z-m$ Lair £3.fl9 

Slarman Janes £3,99 

Caverns orci^os £3.99 

Karma Crez^ ^S.99 

Barm^ ISurgar^ £1.99 

Darts £1.99 

Copta Snatch El. 94 

Bombs Pwstf 6&sil £1.99 

Perilous Pit El ,9^ 

Breaks Kingdcm £1.99 

Bar^iheBold£1.'99 

Rub&vf^nbtia£1.99 

SlHrS^«x,^£1.&S 

The Bella £1.9^ 

Desperaclci Dan £1.49 

.V1ulant^A/arE£1.99 

Miasjon Arihick £i.99 

SMITH SON 
COMPUTINQ 

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Cass — £14.95 
Disk - £19,95 

PERIPHIALS 

CONSUMER 

ELECTRONICS 
Strike C<?n\To\ Jayslichs 

E17.9S (Paif^ 

Casstflte Lead £3.95 

Ariel Lead £2.5p 

Ce^nJfiics Pnnler Cmt- 

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To Older the above please send Cheque/Postal Orde^- made lE^ysbl? \q 

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DRtiL- 



20 Dragon User October 1987 



HACKING SHEETS BV PAUL BURG IN. FREE 



KEY 



(A) 



Substitute the 
worda below* 



brackets for the 



HVF ERIJM UT I U I TV 

Contact Giant Soft NOW for tthat mUAt 
be the beat autorun on the inarket^ 
Paatured Include } powerful ver^lana 
which work for baalo or machin* iiadm 
programs* Sorajnblea projgr&ioq then 
Odmblnea with high or low resolutlcn 
graphic acreens and creates a one part 
autdruj] program. 3 verslojia plus free 
ac^e«^ designera^ flatter, than 
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aflnd chequfls or caah lor HYPERUif to: 
Paul Bur gl 11,1 a Mo or croft Road, 
SJieXfleld 310 *GS. Bargain price C3. 50 



(P) 

<T) 
(S) 



To load the prograjn type "SKIPP: ' 

P0KEl26p4:POKEia7pOs£XEC4fi941" 
fo load the program RUN th« folio- 
wlnsi "10 PORK-3l500ro31510iREJLflM: 
PPKEKp M: NEXT :EIECK-1 1 r DATAtflg . 1 60, 

146, 134,57p 103, 1J03p 126,131 p113" 
To load th« prograjTi type the prog- 
ram ligted balow then add the line 
20 aa detailed in the text .Finally 
RUN the full program, "lO PCLEJtRl s 
ClEARIOsPOftI-1800 TO iaSl:READM; 
P0KEl,M:NEXT:EIECiaO0 30 EEEC , 

Lotid. 

Load the Progx-am normally ualng CLOADM hut before 



n:ui,34pi34p3;i5i;6j42:64;5:uT:^j^o^ 

MJSflpO, 141, 7 J41,2,53|l44p14a, 6,0,159, 126 pf26je5pSl^ "i"ti", 

the prObTO-T^ aa norsflal , then ^ when locdad^ preaa tha R£SET button 



coDunandi, , 

The built-in cheat ayatem la a$ 

follows, .... * 

Thla give a Infinite ll^ea! 

Player 1 

Player 2 



(LIVES) iSubatitute this for the number |—^ 
lof llveg you would like 



(LIVES. 



LBi 



n) (The 
lis ' 



Dta^ElJDiiiq 



Uvea allowed 



typing EXEC, 



.1 

enter 



thii 



lyVADERS REyE^JGE^fiE) P0KE14719 , (LIVEST 



DONKEr KING^To load type "3K:XPP:CL0ADU' 
then FQKE129l4^(LrVES),£j^c 



PLANET INVASIOW-(E) POKE743ep (lIvES-iT 

or PO^ro906,l25 (G) 



SCARFl-lAN-To load 
P0KE£062,Q:£XEC'^ 



type "CL0ADM-\49152: 
This give 3 256 Uvea 



ORIS THE BOLD-(£)POEE 1 9411 , (LrTES). 



JCXTERPTXLAR ATTACK^o load type "SKIPF; 
CLOADM^' then POKE10739r( LIVES) ^^ 
POKElOSaS j;S5. (.G) To run type EIEC 



CRAZY PAnrrER-(A) poke 9953 r (pots OP 

PaIMT AWB BRUSKES-64) or POKE 
10014,125 (INFINITE BRUSHES) or 
POK;E10e06pl25sPOKE1 1798 p 125 {INIIIOTE 
POTS OP FAIKt) Finally EIEC 16384 



CLTTHBERT IN THE JUNGLE-{A) POKE 11 452 p 
(LIVES) or POKE99l6|13 (G) then 
EXEC 16334 



LUNAR ROVER PATROL- (E) P0KE22312p 
(LIVES) 



KING TUT ^POKE 7953.(LIVES) or_PQKE 
10271, 13:P0KB 8257, t3 fG) 



BEAM RZDER-CD) POKE 7733, (LIVES) or 
POKE! 1040,13 (G) To run EIEC 7663 



CAVERNS OF CIIAOS-CF) Type "PIGLET" on 
the title page^* d**preaalixg each key 
for a few aeconda.lr "aucceaiful then 
u^e "E" to accsss tfte^h^it screen. 



IGUTHBERT GOES DIGGING-(A) POKE 
1l675.(LI7E3)tErEC 4096 



HUNCHBACK-(D) POKEa53a4*( LIVES); 
EXEC 252B0 



TRE T<5UCHST0NE-(D} POKE223B4| 255 = 
EIECl6 3e4 Thi3 alavn down tha 
generation qf new monatera. 



MORRISON CHESS-(D) POKE 6401 p224^En;C 
7700 This Improves the colour. 



PEDRO-Uae "SKiPP:SKIPP:CLaADM" to load, then 
any of the followlog pote^p EXEC to run, 
POKE23603,ifl(SEED3-99^ POKE 23620. 
3tHtBRICKS^99) P0KE20475,77 (IriPIiaTE SEEDS) 
P0KE2O5l3p77 (INFINITE BRICKS) POKE 

'16047|125 (Stopa tr&mpa ability to ateal 
^eeda J ) 



GALACTIC AMBC3H-(B) on the acore 
table* POKE 13331 1 CLIVES*not ii»ny) 
or POKE 14783 1 125 (G) Ploally 
EIEC 12936 



DEVIL ASSAULT -(B) POKE 14279* 
{LIVES) or POKE 14553*125 iG) 
To run EXEC l&B 



TEA TIME-(C) 20 POKE 16443 p tLIVES-l5 J or 
^QKE 19996,109 (G) 

JET BOOT COLIN^(C) 20 POKE 7 230, (LIVES) 
or POKEa759,77:PQKE9Q99.77 CG) 



COSMIC 2ftP"<D) POKE 75^56, (LIUES>+1 or 

POKE 7981,13 <G) To run EXEC 13569 



FYre force- CF) Uhen selecting colour^ 
pr^ss fi then C, then ent^r codes 
"IMFTC","USLV" or "TECHNIX" for 
different levels and^or '* ENDLESS" <G)* 
Also "P0KE114,171:P0KEll5p2e5" b*for^ 
loading ui 1 1 access the- autosaMe. 



JUHIORS REyEN6E-(C> 20 POKE 
19529, C'PLflV" game LIUES> 



ESCHPE-Code is "79245" or (E> 
12401,33 ollou^ anything. 



POKE 



CUTHBERT IN THE COOLER-POKE 
8295, CLIUE3=14) 



ro 

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CO 

in 



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SP^CE FleHTER-<fi> 
POKE 16S98, CH I S3 ILES > : EXEC 27392 



hTHLETVX-CC) 20 POKE 15^5 8, 39 This gt^&s 

ma^^imum spt=red with little effo^t- 



SHOCK TROOPER-(C> 20 PGKE 13895, CLIUES) 
or POKE 1?Q75,125 (Q> <F> during a g^me 
pre^s "P,shift+e,R,shift+S" this giv^^ 
a ]n-£-^saige and then you cannot be killed 
by bullets. 



DUNKE Y MUHKE V -PQK£i 1 5 1 2e ^ < L I UES ^ 1 27 > 



Mit I-.] 



^^ftME;^=; 



October 1967 Dragon Us9r 21 



Write: ADVENTURE 

What is that strange creature which keeps popping up? ft must be Pete Gerrafd! 



IN this month's Adventure Treii a littte bit of 
s pace wa s d evole d to a c ro p of gam es fro rr 
Simon Hargrave. and a quote used to 
describe them mentioned 'mobile 
creatures'. So. Iiow would you go about 
programming such a beastie into your own 
programs? Perhaps more importantly, 
wh^t issuch abeastie?! 

J ust abo Lit every ad ve nt u re t h at I Ve ever 
seen has^ by virtue of being an adventure 
game, you . in you r role a& player, as either 
the hero or the viilaim of the piece. You are 
theonewhomakesthedecisionsandcon- 
trols ihe action . deciding what to do when 
and where, and how lo go about doing ii. 
But. even going back to the very first Cof- 
ossat Cave adventure, there were always 
other characters, or mobile creatures, in- 
volved .. 

The annoying pirate would steal your 
treasure" and the euen more annoying 
dwarf would leap out on you from time to 
time and indulge in a knife fight. The pirate 
would appear whenevercertain conditions 
in the game were met. and you {the player) 
would have lo be carrying at least one 
treasure before he would put in his ap- 
pearance. The dwarf would leap out. 
always throwing a knife which missed on a 
first encounter, and thereafter indulge in 
some tiresome and, let's face it, boring 
combat: he was a nuisance who couldn't 
be avoided. One can see rhai there was 
nothing particularly sophisticated about 
those two. and later adventures saw 
something of an advance on these early 
ideas. 

Moving on a year or two, Infocom's StBr- 
cmss had a whole host of characters in it, 
fro m native ch i ef tai n s t h at you h ad to bar le r 
with to get a brown rod, to enormous 
spiders with a fascination for tape 
recorders, and meeting along the way the 
infuriating mechanical maintenance 
mouse, always clearing up any debris he 
might find lying around. He had a capacity 
forgoing through a hole in the wall that im- 
mediately closed up behind him, thus barr- 
ing your progress. A tricking problem, until 
solved with the aid of a couple of thin 
diskcs. The n umber of times that t tried to 
disguise myself as a piece of rubbish and 
lie down on the Floor, thus provoking the 
mouse into picking me up (or so I thought) 
was legion, and needless to say it never 
worked at all. The thin disks hold the key. 

Any other games, tike Lord of the Rings 
and The Habbit, featured characters of 
varying degrees of intelligence, including 
the now-legendary Thorin and his total in- 
ability to do anything other than sit down 
and sing about gold . or so it seemed. Cer- 
tain characters were obviously essential to 
the completion of the game, like EIrond 
and his ability to read a map (and serw 



turich — Ed), G and elf's propensity for 
showing up ro the most unlikely (but 
welcome) circumstances, Balin failing to 
make it onto Bullseye and guesting in a 
computer game, and a variety of inhuman 
opponents such as wargs and trolls. 
How do we go about controlling them? 



Back in Time 

If you remember your Colossel Cai/e youTI 
no doubt recall the bear, a ferocious beast 
easily tamed with a morsel of food and, 
once freed from his golden chain, blessed 
with the ability to attach himself to you like 
a limpet and follow you around for days. 
Follow you onto the bridge, too, if you Ve not 
careful, sending you both plummeting 
downwards into a bottomless abyss while 
reaching for the orange smoke. Now 
som et h i ng I i ke th at is relatively easy to pro- 
gram. Once the bear has been fed and the 
chain rem o ved we cou Id set a variabJ e f I ag , 
6F for example, and then everyhme we 
came round to the WHAT NOW prompt just 
c hec k to see wh eth er or n ot B F was set . I f it 
was. then print up the message Tou are 
being followed by a large, tame bear; but if 
it wasn't then don't print anything and just 
carry on as normal. 

Character could be given to the bear 
quite easily. If, for instance, you dropped 
twothingsatihesame time and theflagBF 
was set you could print "As you drop the 
(whatever] the bear runs away, thinking 
youYe throwing something at it. Howeverjt 
soon calms down and returns to your side.' 
When you approach the bridge and the 
troll asks for his treasure [the original troll 
booth perhaps?), and provided once more 
that the bear flag is set. you would print up 
The troll screams at fhe sight of the bear 
and runs away sh rieking. The bear starts to 
follow but soon comes back to your side 
again; That way you solve the problem of 
the troll but still leave the player with the 
possibility of walking onto a ricketty old 
bridge with an enormous animal by his 
side. The weight is more than the bridge 
can bear, of course. 



Of Dwarves and Pirates 

The dwarf and the pirate are similarly easy 
to program . Provided that the player's ou r- 
rent position falls within a given range 
(can't have the dwarf leaping out from 
behind a rock in the well house) you could 
use the random function of your computer 
Like this, for example: 

IF (CP>10 AND CPBO) AND 
RND(100))95THeNDF=1 



Here we set the dwarf flag, and program 
control could leap off somewhere and 
engage you in a duel with the dwarf. Chek- 
ing for the pirate would followthe same sort 
ot lines: 



IF (CP)30 AND CP':40) 
RND(100})98THENPF-1 



AUD 



and again you'd set the appropriate flag. 
Then, by whisking program control away 
somewhere you could check to see 
whether the player was carrying any 
treasures or not, and provided that he has 
removed them from him and let the beard- 
ed pirate carry them away to his treasure 
chest deep in the maze, with a yo ho ho and 
a bottle of rum thrown in for good measure. 
I f h e wasn 't ca rr y i ng a ny booty wo rt h ste a I - 
ing then carry on as if nothing had 
happened. 

But that is all (dare I say it) fairly 
straightforward stuff, and in the increas- 
ingly sophisticated adventures that we are 
now seeing the player is beginning to get 
used to ever more complicated scenes. 



Other Characters 

I once wrote a spoof version of Cotossat 
Cai^e, called Enormous Cave. Look I n 9 back 
at that program Vm forced to say that I am 
terribly embarrassed by the parser that I 
used (so primitive by standards 
nowadays), but one thing that I'm most 
definitely not embarrassed by was the use 
of a character called Eddie. In the game 
you played the traditional role of exploring 
caves and finding treasures, although 
everything had been moved about and 
solutions to problems were not quite what 
they used to be. and d u ring these explora- 
Mons you bumped into Eddie. He was an 
undergrounddweller. a Neil of Young Ones 
fame really, who probably hindered more 
than helped, but was essential for the com- 
plete solving of the game. You could talk to 
him. ask him to do things, sometimes he 
folfowed you and sometimes not, depen- 
ding on your behaviour, and overaU he 
behaved like a hippy companion of the 
caves would be expected to behave. He 
was, in other words, an integral part of the 
adventure: the sort of person you'd move 
away from if you met them in the puU but 
deep underground when there's no-one 
else around you have no choice in the 
matter. 

This sort of character is reasonably easy 
to introduce into a game, but presumably 
you won't always want a dememted hippy 
walking around and blundering through 
your adventure. Other, perhaps multiple, 
characters are just as useful, and could 



22 Dragon User October 1987 



also be added without any undue pro- 
blems. Exactly what wort of character yo\j 
use is obviously up to you and your adven- 
ture, but they do add to the game as a 
whole. It's hard enough in real life to walk 
through a town without meeting people 
leaping off buses and saying hello to you, 
so to wade for months through an unknown 
land facing unknown hazards in a maze of 
tunnels and corridors, without bumping in- 
to anyone, is pr&tty much well nigh im- 
possible. Bit like shopping in Wigan, really. 

Unfortunately for us the problems in- 
crease with the more characters that you 
have. A western adventure that I once did 
solved this problem by only making a cou- 
ple of t h em ^ nto real I y i ntel I ige nt c h a ps , giv- 
ing you the ability to talk to them and ask 
them to do things, whereas the others just 
appeared and either shot at you, attemp- 
ted to rob you, and whenever you asked 
them a question they pleaded deafness 
and walked away. 

Th is isn't too hard to control, if you use a 
'say' verb: as in "say to Wyatt Earp ^shoot 
the sherrif"". Then you couid analyse the 
first part of the sentence, so that we know 
that the player wanis to talk to Wyati Earp, 
and if Earp is one of those characters who 
can sometimes be persuaded to do 
something we can use the parseragain to 
w6rk through the rest of the input contain- 
ed within quotes and see whether or not 
Earp is going to obey your instructions. He 



might or he might not, depending on how 
youVe programmed him. whether or not 
h e's g ot a ny bu 1 1 ets left , or an y on e of a col- 
lection of different parameters which will 
obviously vary from game to game. 

If the character was one of those who 
woufd never do anything, you could just 
use a stock response like 'He looks at you 
as if you were mad. and walks away' or 
something like that, making sure that you 
then put said character into another loca- 
tion, so that if the player tried to talk to him 
again you could say Talking to you rself is a 
sure sign of madness', or whatever else 
you feel I ike telling the player when he's at- 
tempting to talk to someone who isn't there. 

After this we j ust control all the rest of the 
characters in !he game as if they were so 
many walls, doors, or othr inanimate ob- 
jects. They do precisely what we teH them 
(like throwing axes or stealing treasures) 
and no more. This still gives them the illu- 
sion of reality without the player really 
knowing whether they are real or not. Ob- 
viously a dwarf throwing an axe or kn ife at 
you presents a real enough danger but if 
he never does anything else then he can be 
more or less discounted from the rest of the 
game. 

One simple trick that can be used in you r 
games works as follows. I always try and 
have some kind of 'status line' on display, 
telling the player where he is, what his 
score is. how many moves he's had and 



how much times is left, if it's a time-related 
adventure. To tell him where he is you ob- 
viously can't print the entire room descrip- 
tion out as part of one line, so an enormous 
piece ot prose about the inside of a stable 
might be reduced to 'just inside the stable 
door' Then you can use this to print up 
either Tou are just inside the stable door', 
or " Wy at t Earp i s j u st i ns i d e t h e stab I e door\ 
using the same piece of description for the 
different characters. 



Dragan Adventures 

We can then find out where everyone is in 
the game (perhaps an extended look' 
command) by using all these short room 
descriptions. Sa^/es on memory and adds 
to the game, so it can t be all bad^ 



Conclusion 

n ext m onth , i n r es pon se to a few re q u ests , 

we' 1 1 ta ke a I ook at bu i I d i ng u p a verb or two, 
so that you can see how that is done- Other 
characters might come into it as well so 
we" 1 1 1 ry a nd era m as m any a wk wa rd t h i n gs 
in as possible, thus making it (in the long 
run) easier for you to enter your own verbs. 
I hope! 

Anyway, that'll have to do for this month, 
Bye for now. 



What's new from Prestons 

We are pleased to offer our new range of disk games at Budget Prices 

Kung Fu the Master £4.99 

Copta Snatch £4.99 

Double offer Temple of Doom and Tfie Sword and the Sorcerer £4.99 

Triple offer Ruba Robba, Perilous Pit, Desperado Dan £4.99 

AND THERE ARE MORE TO COME 

New on Cassette — a double feature Star Trek and Reversi £2.99 



SPECIAL OFFERS THIS MONTH 



Dragon Light Pen £12.95 

Joystick Interface £4.95 

Speed ki ng Joystic k £12.95 

5Va" Disks D/S D/D 10 for £4.99 

ALL PRICES INCLUDE P & P AND VAT 

Send now for our new catalogue 

Meet us on Stand 3040 National Gallery Olympla at the PC.W. Show 
Trade only 23/24 Sept Public 25/27 Sept 

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KINGS HALL COURT, ST BRIDES MAJOR, MID. GLAMORGAN 

Telephone: 0656 880965 



THIS VOUCHER GIVES THE BEARER 
SOP OFF A £1.99 GAME OR SOP OFF ANY GAME OVER £2 AT THE PC.W. ONLY 



DP6I 



October 1987 Dragon User 23 





ADVENTURE 

TRAIL 



EVERY so often a little letter comes along 
that deserves printing in full, and anything 
that can cheer me up on a Monday morn- 
ing while at the same time capturing the 
spirit of the true adventurer who wIFI suc- 
ceed no matter w hat , i s most def i n itely one 
otthoseleiters. From Edward OTeary, who 
resides in Exeter, we have (after the usual 
greetings): 

"Yet another cry for help, only eight years 
to retirement and it looks as though I'll 
spend them all trying to solve: Cai/ems 0/ 
Doom, Vortex Factor, Syzygy. Hint sheets 
would be much appreciated (SAE hopeful- 
ly enclosed). 

"I have completed several adventures, 
alth ou gh my t i m e at the key bo a rd i s I i rn ited 
by a demanding famify 

"Love the articles on adventure writing, 
you have inspired a dream. My adventure: 
It wi)l depict a middle aged adveniurer. 
desperately running away, pursued by his 
loving and ever increasing fam ily/relatives. 
His mission- to find the 'silent room', 
wherein lies that which all computer 
adventurers seek ... TIME' ... 

"It'searly morning, thesun is ... AARGH 
. . . the noise, the family is astir ..,, 

"Yours frantically" 

Ther^ is a PS, which for Edwarcl s sake I 
think I'd better print, before his ever in- 
creasing family/relatives take umbrage. 
He does say 'PS Love them all really!" I'll 
believe you, thousands wouldn't. I think 
any member of a family who has ever 
played adventures can easily sympathise 
with Edward. 

B u t o nto m ore spec i f i c Drag n st uff , with 
the offers of heJp in exchange for help. First 
of all we hear from a chap by the name of 
Gareth Loxton , or it could be Roxton , since 
he is obviously destined at som^e point in 
his life to be a doctor and has started his 
training by learning how to write in- 
decipherably. Actually most of his letter's 
all right, it's just the name that led me 
astray but fortunately for us all [since he's 
offeh ng solutions to a variety of games) his 
address is perfectly legible, and he lives at 
the rather apt 1 Rambler Close, Walwayne 
Court, Trowbridge, Wiltshire BAM 9SL. 

Send the usual SAE for help on any of the 
following garmes: Mystery of the Ja\/a S?ar, 
Pettigrew's Diary, The Ring of Dufkr}ess, 
Shenanigans, Dragon's Mountain, Calixto 
Island, Keys of the Wizard, Don't Panic. 
Mansion Ad\/enture and Jerusai&m Adven- 
ture A few old friends In that lot, I think. 

Actu al I y G aret h i s very se I f -d eprec at i n g , 
for in his letter he tells nne that he recently 
bought 15 adventures for the Dragon and 




after playing them for weeks he's only 
managed to solve ten of them. Good grief! 
66 per cent success rate and the man's 
worried. I would refer to It as a major 
triumph, or Honda, to keep someone 
happy. 

Having solved ten. we come to the five 
that he's stuck on, and once again a few old 
favourites are cropping up as per usual. 

Backwards writing time again, which 
means that those nations that read fronni 
right to left wiN think that there's only a few 
words of common sense in the whole col- 
umn, and the rest of it isan enormous clue 
for the world's biggest adventure. What do 
you mean, you think there's only a few 
words of common sense ir^ it? Cheeky 
young pups. Anyway, onto. Vortex Factor, 
where Gareth is stuck at opening the safe. 
Well, or should that be Hew, presumably 
you haven't found the document with the 
combination on it, so (24/92/11 noitanib- 
mocJtnemuGOdteg, reward nepo, eciffoog 
to find out the secret. On the other hand if 
you have got the document and are being a 
bit on the esutbo side, then notianibmoc 
ehtretnedna, tnemucodehtia kool, eciffo 
eht ot og, and to do that you'll need to type 
laid nryt and enter the appropriate 
numbers from the document. Once open, 
you '11 find a bl ue cartridge by efas kool , and 
aftr that you're on your own. 

All touch typists should be made to take 
a course in backwards typing, it reduces 
my typing speed to absolutely nil. 

Anyway, or yawyna, he also wants to 
know how to build the altar in fifac/r Sanc- 
tum, or alter as I believe Gareth has refer- 
red to it. Alter the altar, perhaps. Here we 
go. You will need to find the rood deJian 
after you've found the remmah, which is 
tpyrc eht ni. and then using that you can 
sdraobteg.slianteg.sljanllup. Withtheaid 
of the was. which is tfol eht n i, you can then 
ratia eht ekam and ratia pord in the crypt to 
continue on in the game. Phew! 

Onto Syzygy, and a solution which will 
make you kick yourself. Gareth wants to 
know how to enterthe airless corridor with 
a surt full of holes. Well, if you htaerb dioh 
and then rodirroc retne you 11 be all right. 

Problems with Tangie woo tf next, which 
people ^eem either to solve relatively easi- 
ly or are completely and hopelessly lost. 
Alas for Gareth he is one of the latter type, 
and wants to know how to get out of Dwarf 
Dive. Well, since another problem of his is 
getting into Schark Castle, I think we have 
a severe case of going about things the 
wrong way, here. I refuse to type all this in 
backwards, so if you don't want to know 



anything about Dwyrf Dive then put a card 
over the next paragraph and read on after 
that... 

Send Bruce into Dwarf Dive and press 
rrte bijttan to reset the iifts. Bring him out 
through tho northern exit/entrance and 
down on the lifts to g&t ?rte whiskers. Bring 
him out via eithr the southern or northern ex- 
it and transfer the whiskers to Goliath and 
get him to wear them. Finally to con^plete 
Dwarf Dive, send Goliath in, down on the 
lifts and ladders and then get arohangei 
from the lowest mushroom and give ar- 
changel to Beanbag. This is hard to com- 
plete without getting caught so use the 
Hold and Quit commands quite often. 

So there. 

How to get into Schark Castle? Similar 
sort ot problem, you don't get in at all but 
get someone else to do it. Again, Tm not 
typing allthisoul backwards, so if youdon't 
want to kn ow, cove r u p th e n ex t parag ra p h . 

Send Foghorn into Scharii Castle carry- 
ing the batiehes (after eating and dropping 
the catmint) through the southern entrance. 
Get the Jammer and install the batteries 
and use the Jammer in the cellar, after mov- 
ing the coat, to fu^e the eye. Next, send 
Foghorn up to the fourth level (strange light) 
and get the key. Exit the ca^tte through the 
western door and unlock the boathouse 
and get the net. Then send Foghorn into the 
ca stie and out through the eastern door and 
home. 

And that sorts out the castle, cou rtesy of 
someone whom we will be coming to later, 
a nd w h m i t is p robab ly i m poss i ble to write 
a column about Dragons without mention- 
ing. You know your name. 

But first, a cheery little letter on shock- 
ingly bright yellow paper, why has a wasp 
just entered my room, PANICf! 

Sorry, cheery little letter from S. Robm- 
son in Denby Dale, West Yorkshire, Wrong 
side of the Pennines. but still. For once: not 
a whinge/whineormoan insight, just infor- 
mation for yours truly And I quote: 

"I have recently completed Trekboerartd 
haveafew tips, To kill thespiderput it in the 
room with the red button. But you must 
drug him with the capsule first. To get past 
the forcefield you must get the amulet and 
"WALK FIELD" If you want any more tips 
don't hesitate to ask. I have also finished 
Mansion and Franklin'^ Tomb. Yours 
sincerely." 

This is the stuff, this is what they want. 
Compost Cornerf Short and sweet, no 
mucking about, no requests for eight thou- 
sand help sheets, vooabuiary lists, maps 
and complete solutions for every Dragon 



24 Dragon User October 1987 



ad ve ntu re eve r w r itie n , j u st go ncise a nd to 

the point. Aw! 

Besides, anyone who can spell "cap- 
sule" as "capsual" deserves a mention. 

Okay, okay, neariog the end and Sinnon 
Margrave appears yet again. This is be- 
cause, biess his word processor, !Ve just 
received a rather long letter from him. Ihe 
sort of thing that if Moses had been given 
the choice between posting this and carting 
two en orm o u s tablets of sto ne wit h t he Ten 
Comrmandrnents engraved on them down a 
m ou ntai n , we'd still have t he Te n C o m man d - 
mentsand I would not have seen this letter. 
What is the boy doing, then? 

I was going to say that he was being ex- 
tremely prolific, but according to my dic- 
tionary the origiin of the word lies with our 
Latin friends and means, literally, to make 
offspring. Since the example quoted is "my 
pet h a mste rs we re so pro I i f jc t h at t hey soo n 
n eed ed a i arg e r c age" { my hove re raft is f u 1 1 
of eel&, I l<now) I think Til Just say that he's 
been wf iting a lot of Dragon adventureS: so 
if any of y ou lot o ut t h ere a re f e e i i ng ad ve n- 
ture starved, here's a quick resume. 

Starcrash Tve already mentioned in a 
previous column, and following on from 
that we have part two of the saga, called 
The Kin g s Quest. H ere we ' re s et o n earth i n 
Ibe twelfth century wandering around a 
castle at the mercy of a Mad King. 
Charming. 

The Msaning of Uf9 {hello, helloj sees 
you in control of four characters who can 
work in various states, either normal, 
asleep, waiting and dead. Mobile 
creatures arid real-time adventures eh? 

The latest one Simon refers to as a 
"monster' adventure, with around 200 loca- 
tions and a full English parser if he can fit it 



into the memory. Hmmm.. He describes it 
as being a bit like a science fiction 
Madn&ss and the Minotaur so if it can live 
up to that it should really be rather good. 
More details on this, and the rest, as and 
when Simon sends them on to me, but if 
you feel like diving in blind and buying one 
rt'll set you back £5.00, available from the 
lad himself, Simon Hargrave. at Crawley 
Hill Farm, Uley, Dursley. Gloucestershire 
GL11 5BH. This includes the usual post 
and packing, by the way. 

As we 1 1 as wri t i ng ail I th is lot , he h as a n ex- 
tremely comprehensive list of solutions to 
adventures (apart from Scott Adams ones, 
which he says he can't standi), so by sen- 
ding him 20p and an SAE he1l send you 
back the required sojutron . Presumably he 
also has a list of all the solutions on offer, 
but since he neglected to mention this all 
i m porta nt fact yo u ^d bette r w ri te a nd ask for 
one. 

For some reason he's given me a few tips 



on some of his own adventures, but since I 
haven't seen them yet, and you probably 
haven'teilher, I think we'll skate quickly on 
to the end of this month's column and a 
saga that could go on, and on. and ... 

Two issues ago I mentioned a magazine 
called Adv&ntur& Contact, published up 
her in Wigan by Pat Winstanley. Last issue 
I brought the sad news of its demise. Now, 
it has re-appeared again, with a different 
editor at the helm. Name and address if 
you want to send off for a sample copy 
(El. 00 I believe) of this interesting, though 
not Dragon specific, look at the world of 
adventures is Colin Page, Kingfisher 
Restaurant, 91 Patmerston Road, 
Boscombe. Bournemouth BH1 4HR Yes, 
Kingfisher Restaurant, which makes me 
think of something that's a cross between 
the Restaurant at the end of the Universe 
and Fawlty Towers, but we shall see. 

Okay chaps and chappesses, that's all 
for now. Bye. 



Adventure Contact 

To help puzzled advenlufers further, we iine. 12/13 Little Newport Street, London 

are instituting an Adventure Helpline — WC2H 7PR As soon as enough entries 

simply fill in thecoupon below, stating the have arrived, we will start printing them in 

name of the ad venture, your problem and the magazine. 

your name and address, and send it to Don't worry ~ you'll still have Adven- 

Dragon User Adventure Help- ture Trial to write to as well^ 

Adventure **-...**,,..... ^ .» ... . 

Problein . 

Name .^ . . . 

Adtfress 



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October 1987 Dragon User 25 



All around the square 

When is a triangfe a tetrahedron? Gordon Lee figures it out. 



HOW many squares are there on a stan- 
dard chessboard? I don't mean just the 64 
small squares, but squares of a larger size 
as well. For exampJe, there are larger 
squares which are made up of four of the 
smaller squares, and so on. And don1 
forget the single Jarge square which 
encloses the complete board and which 
measures eight units along its edge. 

If you manage to work that out. what 
about including rectangles as well as 
squares — and whal about grids of a larger 
o rde r th an t he 8 k 8 of the c hess boa rd? Fo r- 
lunaiely, there are mathematical formulae 
which can save us the bother of actually 
counEing ihem by inspection. The total 
number of rectangles (including squares) 
is given by 

(n + n) 

4 

of which 

3 2 

2n + 3n -K n 
6 
are squares, and 

3n' +.gn^ — 3n^ — 2ti 
12 
are rectangles (Jiof includrng squares). In 
these expressions the value n is Ihe order 
of the grid in question — so this would be 
equal to 8 in the case of a chessboard. 
From these formulae we can readily 



determine that in the problem quoted there 
are a total of 1296 rectangles, of which 204 
are squares and 1092 are not. Clearly, for 
any value of n Jhe total given by the first ex- 
pression must be equal to the sum of the 
other two totals. 







n=8 


A 


n(n+ll/2 ; 


36 ■ 


D 


n' 


6A 


a\ 


n= 


512 


£Sf 


n(Ti+l)tn+-2)/6 


120 


& 


n(n+l)(2n+i)/6 


204 



A similar problem relates to a triangular 
lattice. This is taken from a pu^^le book of 
the last century and asks for the total 
number of triarigles which can be found. 

This is a more difficult problem than the 
one of thesquares, not least because there 
are also triangles which point downwards 
as welf. Once again, there is a 
mathematical expression which comes to 
our rescue! 

r^Cn + 2)(2n 4 1) 
8 
In this formula, if the value of n is odd. the 
d i vi sio n by e i g h t d oes not com e o u t exactly, 
so in this case ignore the remainder. So, in 
the diagram, which rs of order 11, there are 
411 triangJes to be found. 



Prize 

Chuckle Egg and Screaming Abdabs 
have been around so long, and played so 
much (see the ongoing palaver in the hi- 
score corner...) that they have attained 
almost legendary status, 

(n keeping with Dragon t/ser's status 
as a legend in its own write, we have col- 
lared Computape (also a legend, of 
course) into puttmg aside a bundle of 
both games for the winners of this 
month's com p. So state your preference 
— y'never know, you might get it. 

Rules 

Firstp complete your grid. Secondly, print 
it out, along with any program notes you 
wish to incJude. Third, enclose said grid 
and printout in an envelope, along with 
your name and address, mark the whoJe 
caboodle OCTOBER COMPETITION^ 
and send it to us here. 

But not before completing the 
tiebreaker! To do that thing, peruse the 
sentence "I go to work on an egg 
because.. " and send it along. We may 
put you to work on an egg.., 

July wifiiters 

Now. everyone knows that these com- 
petitions are judged er^tirely on the cor^ 
rectness of the solutions, the elegance of 
the programming and (he ingenuiiyof the 



entrants' excuses for not getting it in til f 
the last moment — but it never hurts to 
have a wizard tiebreaker as well! Few folk 
had any trouble solving the MUSC 
MAKER problem, but some real raspber- 
ries were blown upon the English 
language, of which some of the best 
were: 

Bits and PCs by the Dave Clark 101^ 
(DaveLardner) 

'^'^ All Gomg On A Summer Holiday 
by Buster Blackpool (Rachel Hart, all 
written out m music.) 

tVs So Easy by The Winners and Haw 
Da You Do ft by The Losers (and mosl of 
our other contributors as well (Fred 
Taylor) 

Sup&fcalifragatistocexpialidocious by 
S,N. Error (John Smal(wood) 

503rd Symphony by IMockanuva Tunov 
(Richard Long) 

and a very special mention for Sweet 
Sixie&n by ex Emma d'Essimal (Fred 
Willers). 

The ten best overall entries will be get- 
ting copies of John Penn Software's 
Music Maker, and the next ten will get 
£3.00 discount vouchei^ from the Penns, 
Slay tuned! 

Solution 

This month's solution is. we believe, on 
the opposite page- 



Formulae can also be of great help when 
dealing with the 'figurate' numbers, 
reference to which is frequently made of 
these pages. The five principal figurates 
are triangular, square, cubic, tetrahedral, 
and pyramidal numbers, and by using the 
formulae given the nth term of any of the 
seriescan be easily found. The table gives 
the formulae for these figurates and, as an 
examplep the value when n = a. 




Problems are often found m which U is 
necessary to find values which belong 
simultaneously to two of the categories of 
figu rate numbers. For example, what is the 
smallest number (not including 1) that can 
be both triangular and square? The 
answer is 36. this being the eighth 
triangular number and the sixth square 
number. There are an infinite number of 
triangular/square numbers but 36 is the 
smallest, and this forms the basis of the 
competition this month. Complete the grid 
so as to indicatethefirst f/^ree terms which 
match up in each of the pairs of categories 
as shown . We have started you off with the 
36 in space (a). Note that we are not in- 
cluding 1 in any of the sections. Also, in 
section (e) we only require two values 
(there are only two1); and in section (f) only 
one as there is only one value that is both 
square and pyramidal. 



Triwaff^lnr 


{*) }i» 


X 


ib) 


(^:- 




£qiLBPe 


(d> 


C«J 


{13 






C^^bi" 


X 


>< 




Vi 


trabsdraJ. 


? 

* 



Don't bother trying to fill in the other 
boxes. Those ^marked with an ^X^ have 
been proved to be impossible. As for the 
box marked '?', although the existance of 
such a number has not been disproved, if 
one exists it wiil be so enormously largo 
that it will fall outside the requirements of 
even these competitions! 



26 Dragon User October 1987 



The Answer 



This is Gordon Lee*s own 

solution to the June competition 

see page 24 for results 



ANSWER: There are two possibte 
substitiitions for MUSIC MAKER: 

13924 and 15876 
or 

23716 and 29584 
Solution: As there are nine different hWers 
in the words MUSIC and IVIAKER eacii of 
the nine digits (1 to 9) must be used on a 
one-to-onesubstilution. First of all we need 
to find all perfect squares which consist of 
five d if te ren ct d ^g its , \f\ en we need to s e I ect 
possible pairs from this list. 

These possible values are computed in 
the loop 'N'. Each value in the range 112 to 
314 PS squared in turn, and the resulting 
value is placed in the string variable S$ 
(line 140). Because of the leading " space 
placed in this string when the computer 



creates a string variable fro mi a numeric 
variable, this extra character is re moved 
using the MID$ comrnand. The remaining 
five digits are then tested, first to see if a 
zero is present (lines 160 to 180). and then 
to check that all five digits are different 
{lines 200 to 220). A flag (FL) is set initially 
to zero for each lest and is raised to 1 if 
either a zero or a dyplicate digit is found. 
Values which pass both tests are then 
sto red l n th e array A$() . 

This array is originally dmensioned to a 
size of 50 units, although in fact, only 42 
numbers are eventually stored. Once this 
array is filled the program cross-checks the 
values that it contains for suitable pairs. To 
satisfy the terms of the question each pair 
of nunnbers should start with the same 



number (as both words connmence with 
the letter 'M'), while all other digits should 
be different. The program takes each unit 
of the array in turn and compares with it all 
those values which are to be found further 
down the list (lines 280 to 290). 

First, line 300 checks that both numbers 
commence with the same digit. Then all 
possible values are combined into variable 
Y$. This van able contains the whole of the 
first number and the last four characters of 
the second number. The final test (lines 
330 to 350 J checks to see that each ot the 
nine digits contained in the string are dif- 
ferent ffom each other. Those pairs that 
pass this test are then printed out- 

This results in the two pairs of values 
given. 



> 

5 


CLEAR 500 




100 


DIM AS CSC) 




110 


T=l 




120 


FOR N=112 TO 314 




130 


S-M*N 




140 


S5=STRS(S:) ;S$=nid$i;b$,2:> 




150 


FL=0 




160 


FDR F-1 TO 5 




170 


IF MIDS(3^,F, 1>="0" THEN FL=1 




ISO 


NEXT F 




190 


IF rL--=l THEN 240 




200 


FOR F==l TO 4: FOR G=F+1 TO 5 




210 


IF MID$(SS,F, i:)=niDS(SS,G, 1) THEN FL^l 




220 


NEXT G;NEXT F 




230 


I F FL=0 THEN PR I NT N ; " " ; S$ : AS k T j :--:S 5 : T^ 


==T-M 


240 


NEXT N 




250 


T=T-1 




2 SO 


PRINT: RR I NT" report-No of Variables: "; T 




270 


PR I NT ; PR I NT " CROSS-CHECK I NG : " 




280 


FOR P=l TO T-1:F0R Q=F+1 TO T 




290 


Y$=A*(P) : Z*=A$(Q:) 




300 


IF LEFTS(Y$, 1:j<>LEFT$<ZS, DTHEN 370 




310 


Y*=Yti+MID$(Z5,2> 




320 


FL=0 




330 


FOR F==l TO 3: FOR G=F+1 TO 9 




340 


IF MID^(;Y$,F, 1>=MIDS(Y$,G, 1> THEN FL=1 




350 


NEXT G:NEXT F 




360 


IF FL=0 THEN PRINT A^CP;);" "jASa:!) 




370 


NEXT Q:NEXT P 





October 1987 Dragon User 27 



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JOHH PENN DISCOUNT SOFTWARE, DEAN FARM COTTAGE, KINGSLEY, BORDON, HANTS, GU3S 9NG. 

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and error messages. 

SPOOLUTILITY E5.00 

Use computer -while prinliriig. iSK prim butler TYPIST 
program lu^n& Dragon intotypQ^/rrter 

NEW FOR 87: 

ICONS UTILITY ES-jW 

Pul iO£>n3 in your program? Con-trolled by cursor or 
■ mouse". Commands !o define, ctear. load and save icon 
poSilioriS and windovya. 

STRUCTUR UTILITY tS.OO 

Another first! Siruclured @ASlC or\ tHte Dragon! Allows 
nam ed procedures, improved loopcoritrcils by WH I LE . . . 
WEND, and RE PEAT U NT IL etc 



D0$ UTILITY £5.00 

Make friends with your DOS? Ertter all Xhs main DOS 
commands, plus LIST, EDIT file, and select 1iles by 
cursor or "mous^". 

WHAT THEY SAY ABOUT 
BASIC 42: 

''probably the best Step SO far" ,,, Dragon User 
'"an invaluable utiiily" ... Dragon Update 

HARDWARE 

Memory ypgrade$ FROM £3^.00 

Sup^r^O^Cdflnd^e £7^.00 

Cuinana DL&k drives FROM il^aOO 

S ufK&ttios CO nlrol ler {ch ip only) £10.00 

P&aksott joyslich (ideal "mouse "} ^5.50 



DISK SOFTWARE FOR DRAGON 32f64^2a 
WITH DRAGONDOS^CUMANA DOS 2.0 

' ' MEW ' * 
Plxla(FiAlndsoft} £14.95 

Icon-driven. drawing program. Fte<iuiresjCiySlfcCk. 

DSKOREAM (Grosvenor) £19.95 

The ftlandard Dragon Edilor/jflssembler 

D.R.S (Grosvenor) E^.-as 

Machine c^ode database program 

$OU^CHMAKER (Pamcomms) £8.50 

Disassembler for use With DSKDREAM 

DISK-KIT (Pamcoinms} £5 9^ 

Sort out your d iSit problem s 

Cliequefi/RO.'a^Further detai Is^dealer eoquiri es to: 



PRI N T E R C ON T ROL" FROfWI £1 9.95 
Aiext AND graphics proDfrssor 

DUMPER' FROM £5.45 
Rglocal^ble screen dump program 

COLOR PRiNT' FROM £6.50 
PMod& 3 screen dump program 

* * NEW * * 

STA RLITE LIGHTPEN S/W* CASS KOO 

U pgr^de includes scr^^^ dump DISK Lfi.OO 

MONITOR/ASSEMBLER* CASS £12,00 

Pr int^r originated DJSK £15.00 

*Pfices vary according to prinfter: please specify. 



M014EYB0X (Harils) t14.SS 

Home and small business accounts 

MAILBOX (Harris) £16.99 

Se-.ettive myiling list program 

SHAREBOX (Harris) £16.99 

Manage your slocks and shajes' 

SAL£$BOX (Harris) £13 98 

Balance B/F Sales Ledger' 

BILLSBOX (Harris) £19.99 

Balance- Bj'F Purchase Leoger 

CASHBOX £Hamfi) tlS.S^ 

Double-sntry Nomina^ Le<lg&r 

STOCKSOX (Hams; 0@.99 

Fuii-ie^lured Slodk Control. 

ORDERBOX (Harris) £l£.dd 

Invoicing kink^gd ^u Scales Or SlOCk 



HARRIS MICRO SOFTWARE 

49 Alexandra Road, Hounslow, Middlesex, TW3 4HP Tel: (01) 570 8335 drs?